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14 posts from September 2017

Once and for All: Lead-Free, Healthy Kids

September 26, 2017

Baby_mother_playing_400x300We want all our children to be safe and happy — that's why we have safeguards in place to protect them. Newborns are taken home from the hospital in car seats, kindergarteners must have all their vaccines to enter school, even playground equipment is closely regulated. Yet, despite these investments their health and safety, children are still at risk in their own homes. While we are closer than ever to eliminating lead in homes, it's still all too prevalent, seeping into the lives of our children through peeling paint, unfiltered water from unsafe pipes, and other sources.

Even though lead poisoning is entirely preventable, 535,000 children under the age of 6 in the United States are exposed to the dangerous toxin each year through water, paint, soil, and other sources. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "at least 4 million households have children living in them that are being exposed to high levels of lead." Lead exposure can lead to learning disabilities, speech delays, attention deficit disorder, reduced motor control and balance, and aggressive behavior. In fact, kids with lead poisoning are seven times as likely to drop out of school than their non-lead-poisoned peers, are six times as likely to become involved in the juvenile justice system, and as adults face increased risks of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, depression, and early mortality.

When the Flint water crisis became international news, it was easy to brush it aside as an anomaly — something that would never happen in your own town. But in 2016 a report by Reuters found three thousand localities across the country where at least 10 percent of children — double the rate of lead poisoning in Flint at the height of the crisis — had elevated levels of lead in their blood. In some cities, "the rate of elevated [lead] tests over the last decade was 40 to 50 percent." Many of the affected communities are low-income and majority African-American and Latino populations, a sadly unsurprising fact given the stark racial disparities when it comes to addressing lead poisoning. In fact, African American children are roughly 5 times more likely and Latino children are nearly twice as likely to be poisoned by lead than their white peers.

The reality is that the "next Flint" is not just imminent; it's already here. It's happening in communities across the country, but if community leaders and elected officials make lead poisoning prevention a priority — pass smart legislation, invest in prevention measures in low-income neighborhoods, and educate their communities — we can address the issue in just five years.

Fortunately, a blueprint for lead eradication already exists. Seeing how unhealthy housing has been undermining the health of growing children, we at the Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) took action in our home community of Baltimore, starting in 1986. Working together with community leaders and local officials, GHHI, then Parents Against Lead, started a grassroots volunteer effort to change public policy and bring funding to older, lower-income neighborhoods in Baltimore to make homes safer for everyone. With the use of techniques like window replacement to remediate lead paint hazards in homes, as well as the dedication and investment from the city and other local organizations, we've seen real progress in making homes across the city safe for all kids, with a 98 percent reduction in childhood lead exposure in Maryland over the last thirty years. GHHI has since expanded its efforts to more than thirty cities to ensure that every child has a healthy and safe home, regardless of zip code or socioeconomic status. 

Today more cities and states are passing legislation and dedicating resources to prevent lead exposure, and a growing number of foundations are increasing their financial support for such efforts. In Pennsylvania, which ranks third in the nation for most housing built before 1950 — a major risk factor for lead poisoning — Governor Tom Wolf is calling for mandatory lead testing for every infant in the state.

To expand our network of partner organizations, we recently kicked off our national Campaign to End Lead Poisoning by announcing the Lead Poisoning Prevention Catalytic Award — we're working with the JPB Foundation to bolster, financially and programmatically, up to five nonprofits stepping up to do what's right for their communities. Both private and public involvement is essential to this fight, and by working together we will ensure that no more children are made sick by their own homes.

With families, schools, and communities all facing numerous challenges, you might ask, "Why lead?" One reason is that the math is on our side, too: Every dollar spent on preventing lead exposure can generate up to a $221 return on investment. The U.S. could save more than $50 billion annually if we act to prevent these devastating health impacts. Investing in lead poisoning prevention will lower healthcare costs and help keep kids in school and out of trouble—and able to reach their full potential.

We need to make the same level of commitment to ensuring that every child in every home is safe from toxins like lead as to ensuring s/he is safe in the car, at school, and on the playground. "Contaminated" is the last word any family wants to hear when it comes to their home, but "contaminated," "dangerous," and "toxic" are words all too familiar to millions of families across the country. It's time to take action and invest in rehabilitating homes across the country to end lead poisoning once and for all.

Ruth_ann_norton_for_philantopicRuth Ann Norton is president and CEO of the Green & Healthy Homes Initiative.

Commitments for Mexico Earthquake and Hurricane Maria Relief

September 22, 2017

Following hard on the heels of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, Hurricane Maria has wreaked havoc in Puerto Rico, Dominica, and other Caribbean islands, many already devastated by earlier storms, and continues on its path of destruction. In Mexico City and surrounding areas, a 7.1-magnitude earthquake on September 19 — which followed an earlier quake September 7 — has left dozens of buildings completely collapsed and a death toll of 286 and climbing. Pledges from corporations, foundations, public charities, and individuals for relief and recovery efforts are beginning to come in. Here are the commitments of at least $25,000 tracked by our Foundation Center colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato as of September 22.

For commitments designated for both Harvey and Irma relief, please see our updates to the Harvey relief commitments announced by corporate foundations and corporate giving programs, foundations, public charities, and individuals. For commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief, see our post here. Please also see Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants.

[We're continuing to update the tables as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates.]

Commitments from Company-Sponsored Foundations, Corporate Giving Programs, Foundations, Public Charities, and Individuals

GRANTMAKER TYPE RECIPIENT AMOUNT NOTES
3M Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 For Latin American relief for Hurricane Maria, Mexico earthquake
Amgen Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Direct Relief, Unknown Recipient(s) $5,050,000 $50,000 to Direct Relief for Mexico earthquake relief; $3 million for urgent relief and $2 million for long-term relief from Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico
Bacardi & Company Limited Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $3,000,000 For communities in Florida, Puerto Rico, the Caribbean, the Bahamas, and Mexico impacted by Hurricanes Irma and Maria and Mexico earthquake
Carlos Beltran Individual Fundación Carlos Beltran $1,000,000 For Hurricane Maria relief
CEMEX, S.A.B. de C.V. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Value of donated building materials; for Mexico earthquake of 9/7/17
Direct Relief International Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 For deployment of emergency medical response personnel and essential medical supplies; for Mexico earthquake of 9/7/17
Facebook, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program International Red Cross $1,000,000 Will also waive fees on donations to UNICEF made on its Facebook page for Mexico earthquake relief7
Fundación Metlife México Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Fondo para la Paz $400,000 For earthquake of 9/7/17
Fundación Wal Mart de México Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(S) $2,200,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Salma Hayek Individual GoFundMe $100,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Home Depot Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $500,000 For Mexican earthquake relief; also product donations from Home Depot Mexico
Honeywell Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Mexico Secretaría de la Defensa Nacional (SEDENA) $400,000 Value of donated personal protective equipment for Mexico earthquake relief
Humana Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000 For Puerto Rico for Hurricanes Irma and Maria relief
Kaiser Permanente Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program International Medical Corps $1,000,000 For first responders for Mexico earthquake relief
Jennifer Lopez Individual Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For Hurricane Maria relief
Ricky Martin Individual Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 YouCaring campaign; for Hurricane Maria relief
Shawn Mendes Individual GoFundMe campaign $100,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
PepsiCo Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Pan American Development Foundation $2,250,000 For Mexican earthquake relief, including earthquake of 9/7/17; for hurricane relief in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean
United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipients(s) $50,000 Customer match; for Hurricane Maria relief
UPS Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Mexican Red Cross (earthquake), American Red Cross (Hurricane Maria) $25,000 Value of in-kind donation for Mexico earthquake relief
Vallarta Supermarkets Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program CENACED $50,000 Customer match; for Mexico earthquake and Hurricane Maria relief
Wal-Mart Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $565,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 For Mexico earthquake relief
Western Union Foundation and Western Union Company Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation and Corporate Giving Program Save the Children, Unknown Recipient(s) $55,000 Agent match ($10,000); employee match ($25,000) for Mexico earthquake relief
Mark Zuckerberg Individual Mexican Red Cross $1,000,000 For Mexico earthquake relief; also Facebook waiving fees on donations to UNICEF made through Facebook tools
Total: $22,445,000

 


September 25, 2017

The Amgen Foundation, Inc., which had pledged $50,000 for Mexico earthquake relief efforts, announces commitments totaling $5 million for Hurricane Maria relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

Carlos Beltrain announces a $1 million commitment for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

Facebook, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $1 million commitment for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Kaiser Permanente Corporate Giving Program announces a $1 million commitment for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

Jennifer Lopez announces a $1 million commitment for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

Ricky Martin announces a $100,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

Shawn Mendes announces a $100,000 pledge for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $50,000 pledge for Hurricane Maria relief efforts.

The UPS Corporate Giving Program announces a $50,000 pledge for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

The Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program announces a $250,000 commitment for Mexico earthquake relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $22,445,000


SPARCC: Rewriting the Playbook on Equitable Infrastructure Investment

September 21, 2017

Sparcc_for_philantopicThroughout the history of the United States, major public infrastructure investments have spurred economic development and shaped entire regions. From the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825 to the completion of the Interstate highway system in 1992, publicly funded infrastructure has played a critical role in the development of our modern economy.  

Yet the story of major infrastructure investments is hardly all positive: Residents of nearly any city in America can point to a large-scale project that displaced and decimated the wealth and social fabric of communities of color, for example. Interstate 81 destroyed the 15th Ward of Syracuse, New York, while Interstate 75 dismantled Detroit's "Black Bottom" neighborhood, home to thousands of people and three hundred and fifty African American-owned businesses. In New York City, mega-projects like the Cross Bronx Expressway put a physical barrier between low-income communities of color and opportunities to earn better livelihoods.  

Major public infrastructure projects can also have harmful impacts on health and climate by increasing our dependence on fossil fuel consumption, increasing CO2 emissions, exacerbating respiratory illnesses like asthma, and inhibiting people's physical activity. And too often, infrastructure investments in walking and cycling amenities, new transit, improved stormwater drainage, broadband, or parks don't reach the people and neighborhoods that need them most.

Mindful of the high stakes of getting infrastructure right, several leading foundations, working in close collaboration with four national partners, have launched the Strong, Prosperous and Resilient Communities Challenge. SPARCC aims to create opportunities for low-income people and communities of color through strategies that promote equity, better health outcomes, and climate resilience. All three of these goals can be realized by amplifying regional public investments in housing, transit, and other impactful infrastructure so that their benefits can be shared equitably—and by empowering the communities that stand to benefit.  By demonstrating how investments in the built environment can create a path for all of a city's residents to thrive, we aim to rewrite the national playbook for how such projects are designed and implemented in the future.

In this month's edition of the Community Development Investment Review, published by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, we describe how the Robert Wood Johnson, Ford, Kresge, and JPB foundations and the California Endowment — along with our implementing partners, the Low Income Investment Fund, Enterprise Community Partners, the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco — worked together to develop this ambitious six-site, $90 million initiative. Together, we aim to test a different model for development — one that harnesses a major public investment in infrastructure to prioritize the needs of low-income people for healthy, resilient, and connected communities, rather than cutting people off or displacing them. We hope that SPARCC can point the way toward reversing a series of urban policy and programmatic decisions that kept communities of color out of the decision-making process, and resulted in decades of disinvestment in low-income communities across the nation, fueling enormous disparities in health and economic opportunities between zip codes that are often just a few miles apart.

We designed SPARCC to capitalize on catalytic moments, those rare times in the life of a community when it is ripe for action. While a significant infrastructure initiative (like the buildout of a regional transit system) is often that catalyst, new leadership, population shifts, strong public will, policy overhauls — or even efforts to recover from a natural disaster, like Superstorm Sandy — can also attract a significant pool of private and public capital and accelerate opportunity. SPARCC pursues a multiplier effect in that opportune moment — for example, taking advantage of the buildout of transit to prioritize affordable housing development near transit stops, or ensuring that a major investment in greenways or revitalization offers benefits to low income communities, rather than triggering rising rents and displacement.

After a competitive review process, the SPARCC partners selected six places for SPARCC to support over the next three years: Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Memphis and the San Francisco Bay Area. In that period, each region will be awarded $1 million in direct grant and technical assistance funds to support cross-sector efforts to retool policy and development practice. Collectively, the regions will benefit from an additional $14 million for programmatic support in areas including data systems, policy, and communications. A $70 million pool of investment capital — some from the participating foundations, some leveraged through institutions that finance community development — will also be available for community-based projects.

Kabel_kenyon_roertyRecognizing that SPARCC's ambitious goals will require more than a three-year grant period to achieve, we will support cross-sector leaders and accelerate change so that the six regions are equipped to carry out the vision over the long term — and share their learning with communities across the country. We plan to share our own learnings along the way, and invite the engagement of new partners who are also interested in learning how to leverage systems to achieve health, climate and equity goals.

Public infrastructure dollars can and should do much more to promote equitable, resilient, and healthy communities. Our aspiration is that SPARCC will begin to provide a new roadmap, based on the experience of these six regions, that can inform policy and practice in cities across the U.S.

Read our full article here.

Chris Kabel is deputy director of health at  the Kresge Foundation, Amy Kenyon is a program officer for equitable development at the Ford Foundation, and Sharon Z. Roerty is a senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Commitments for Hurricane Irma Relief

September 20, 2017

In the nearly two weeks after Hurricane Irma devastated wide swaths of the Caribbean and Florida, corporations, foundations, and public charities have pledged support for relief and recovery efforts. Here are the commitments of at least $25,000 tracked by our Foundation Center colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato as of September 20.

For commitments designated for both Harvey and Irma relief, please see our updates to the Harvey relief commitments announced by corporate foundations and corporate giving programs, foundations, public charities, and individuals. See also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake.

[We're continuing to update the tables as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates.]

Table 1: Company-Sponsored Foundations, Corporate Giving Programs

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
Abbvie Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Hurricane Irma - Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 Also employee match
Allergan Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $150,000 $100,000 to American Red Cross for relief efforts in Florida; $50,000 for relief efforts in Caribbean
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program MusiCares $25,000
Amgen Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Direct Relief, American Kidney Fund $100,000 Also employee match
Amway Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match
Anthem Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Americares $75,000 Also employee match
AT&T Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Team Rubicon, Telecoms Sans Frontieres, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,400,000 $1,000,000 to Team Rubicon; $150,000 to Telecoms Sans Frontieres
Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,250,000 $1,000,000 to be allocated when an assessment is completed
BankUnited, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $100,000 For impacted areas of Florida
BB&T Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 Includes $250,000 in donated supplies
BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $825,000 $75,000 for employee match
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $1,000,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida
Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $100,000
Charter Communications, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Rebuilding Together $1,350,000 Includes $1,000,000 in donated public service announcements
Charter Communications, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Rebuilding Together $1,350,000 Includes $1,000,000 in donated public service announcements
Chevron Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program DonorsChoose.org $400,000 For local public school classroom projects in south Florida
Chevron Global Fund Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $600,000 Also employee match
Citi Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000
Coca-Cola Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Immediate relief and long-term rebuilding
CUNA Mutual Group Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation CUAid $50,000 For affected credit union partners and employees
CVS Health Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Florida Disaster Fund, CVS Health Employee Relief Fund $75,000
eBay Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $100,000 For impacted areas of Gulf Coast
Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $250,000 Also product donations from company
Enterprise Holdings Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Americares $1,000,000 $750,000 to American Red Cross; $250,000 to Americares
EVERTEC, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program United for Puerto Rico – Together Changing Trajectories, Unknown Recipients $150,000 For relief efforts in Puerto Rico; $50,000 for social media match
FedEx Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and value of transportation support
Fifth Third Bank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 $250,000 for employee match
Ford Motor Company Fund Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $150,000 Employee match.
Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $500,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida and the Caribbean. Also employee match
Google.org Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $1,250,000 For impacted areas in southeastern United States and Caribbean; $250,000 for employee match
Humana Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee match
IBM Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 Shelter and call center management. Also donations of Cloud and consulting, and technologies for large-scale volunteer management for Government and NGO partners
JPMorgan Chase & Co. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 For impacted areas in United States and Caribbean
Kohl's Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee volunteerism
Lowe's Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and in-kind donations. Also customer donations
MAXIMUS Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Volunteer Florida $100,000
McKesson Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Americares $185,000 Value of donated product
Mckesson Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $125,000 Employee match
Merck & Co., Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund, Multiple Recipients 1,250,000 Also product donations
Microsoft Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $750,000 Also donation of tech services
New York Life Insurance Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Save the Children, Feeding America, UNICEF, NYLIC Family Disaster Assistance Fund $450,000 Also employee match; $100,000 for impacted agents and employees
NextEra Energy Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Florida Disaster Fund $1,000,000 Also employee match
Norfolk Southern Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Feeding Tampa Bay, Feeding South Florida $100,000
Paypal Holdings, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Save the Children $200,000 Also customer donations
PepsiCo Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Feeding America, American Red Cross $1,750,000 For assistance in Florida and the Southeast U.S., Mexico, Caribbean
Prudential Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000 Also employee match
Royal Bank of Canada Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $300,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida and the Caribbean
Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Canadian Red Cross $500,000 $250,000 for relief and recovery efforts in the Caribbean; young people in affected communities
Sealed Air Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program World Food Program USA, American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity $225,000 $100,000 each for emergency aid for the Caribbean and mainland U.S.; $25,000 for employee match; also product donations
StorageMart Partners, L.P. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program GlobalGiving $25,000 Employee match
SunTrust Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 $250,000 to American Red Cross
Target Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, Save the Children, UNICEF, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and in-kind donations
United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $50,000 Customer match
UnitedHealth Group Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $1,000,000 For impacted Florida communities. Also employee match
UPS Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $1,000,000 For recovery efforts in the Caribbean, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. Includes cash grants, in-kind transportation movements and technical expertise
Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match.
Verizon Communications Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hand in Hand $2,500,000
VS Health Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Value of donated water
Walgreens Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 For relief efforts in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. Also donating food and water.
Wal-Mart Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $10,000,000 Customer match
Walt Disney Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Irma - Multiple Recipients 2,500,000 For Florida, the Caribbean, and other impacted areas
Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,100,000 $500,000 to American Red Cross; $100,000 for relief and recovery efforts in the Caribbean
Xerox Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $75,000 $75,000 for employee match
Total: $49,210,000

 

Table 2: Foundations

Charles and Margery Barancik Foundation, Inc. Independent Foundation All Faiths Food Bank $172,000 For two weeks of food
Charles and Margery Barancik Foundation, Inc. Independent Foundation Pines of Sarasota Foundation $202,000 For air conditioning
Total: $374,000

 

Table 3: Public Charities

American Kidney Fund, Inc. Public Charity Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $120,000 Emergency disaster relief assistance to 500 dialysis patients
Our Family Foundation, Inc. Public Charity American Red Cross $250,000 For hardest hit areas in Florida
PetSmart Charities, Inc. Public Charity Hurricane Irma - Unknown Recipient $1,000,000 For animal welfare organizations. Also product donations
PetSmart Charities, Inc. Public Charity Miami-Dade Animal Services $100,000
PetSmart Charities, Inc. Public Charity Atlanta Humane Society $15,000
Total: $1,485,000


September 22, 2017

The CUNA Mutual Group Foundation announces a $50,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The MAXIMUS Foundation, Inc. announces a $100,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

The New York Life Insurance Company Contributions Program announces a $450,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The Norfolk Southern Foundation announces a $100,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $48,335,000


September 25, 2017

The United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $150,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program announces a $825,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $49,210,000


Disrupting the Traditional K-12 Model

September 19, 2017

Computer_classI remember my fourth grade classroom outside Seattle: rows of plastic desks with uncomfortable chairs that inevitably had old bubble gum stuck to the bottom. My teacher sat at a larger wooden desk in front of a large chalkboard, every inch of which was often covered. I remember hurrying to copy all those math equations and English homework questions into my notebook before they were all erased.

You will not be surprised to hear that my kids' teachers rarely use chalk. Students today will never take notes on paper or have to remember what had been on a long-erased chalkboard. These changes have affected not only the way teachers teach and the way students learn, but also the way classrooms and teaching tools can be designed to optimize teacher effectiveness and student ability.

I've noticed two tremendous opportunities in the disruption of the traditional K-12 model — trends that are helping educators reimagine the classroom and how they teach, and reshaping the student learning experience. The first is the imperative to democratize digital skills; the second is the increasing potential of personalized learning and approaches that put students at the center of education.

Democratizing Digital Skills

Recent studies show that we are facing a digital skills gap, and this is especially true when it comes to young girls and underrepresented minorities. Computer science knowledge has become essential in today's job market, but students, especially those in underserved communities, are not getting exposure to it. On the flip side, when technology tools and a STEM-related (science, technology, engineering, and math) curriculum are made available in every classroom and to every student, it leads to profound impact. We at Salesforce.org can see this right here in the Bay Area. In the San Francisco Unified School District, where Salesforce.org has supported efforts to expand computer science education and improve access to a quality education, enrollment in computer science courses across twenty-one middle schools has increased from 1 percent of students to 35 percent in five years. We're also reaching new demographics in computer science, with nearly 50 percent of female students and more than 50 percent of underrepresented youth enrolled in computer science courses.

Personalized Experience

For students who do not thrive in traditional one-size-fits-all classrooms, there's a need for flexible, personalized models. We're starting to see the potential in personalized and competency-based learning models — the Lindsay Unified School District in California's Central Valley is a good example. Lindsay dismantled its entire system based on one question — "What kind of learners do we want our kids to be?" — and shifted the focus from the teacher to the learner. Instead of advancing at the same rate regardless of whether they're ready, students now advance to the next unit only once they master a competency.

Just as businesses increasingly are putting personalized consumer experience at the center, education is putting individual student learning at the center. A decade ago such a shift would have been impossible, but advances in technology have made this a reality, with hyper-personalized models leading to student success and deeper connections between the student and the school. For example, Boston Day and Evening Academy (BDEA), an alternative charter high school that serves at-risk youth, used the Salesforce platform to implement a tracking system that can flag issues early, enabling the school to step in and provide guidance, counseling, and/or other interventions to help students stay on track.

Building off of personalized learning, virtual schools that offer flexibility and competency-based learning also are gaining traction. Online learning in K-12 wasn't an option when I was growing up, but it's now a reality for students who thrive in a non-traditional classroom setting. While online learning isn't right for every student, it serves as a complement to traditional schools and offers an alternative way for students to learn.

These disruptions to the traditional K-12 model have the potential to create future innovators, builders, out-of-the-box thinkers and change makers, and we owe it to our students to leverage technology and provide non-traditional options to help them learn and succeed.

Rob-Acker_for_PhilanTopicRob Acker is CEO of Salesforce.org, the social enterprise arm of customer-relationship management software provider Salesforce.com.

Keeping the Dream Alive: The Case for Faster Funding

September 13, 2017

DACA_protestThis is a difficult time for our country. The forces of hate and bigotry have emerged from the shadows. White supremacists are marching through the streets proudly waving swastika-adorned flags. And Donald Trump has validated them by throwing more than 800,000 immigrant Dreamers under the bus, revoking their immigration status in a callous act that could have repercussions for years to come.

The hard truth is that, in this moment, funders have to rethink "business as usual" to meet the needs of the moment: with the world aghast at the prospect of 800,000 hardworking Dreamers being deported, and with a White House tacitly endorsing white supremacy, we have to rally behind and expand the fight for justice. Now.

That means identifying innovative mobilization efforts, funding them fast, and taking our cues from the communities we are trying to empower.

Right after Election Day, the Women Donors Network worked in partnership with Solidaire Network and other funders to launch the Emergent Fund, a new kind of fund that was designed to be nimble, responsive, and led (at all levels) by people who are the most marginalized. With quick-turnaround grants of up to $50,000, the fund made it possible for new organizations springing up in response to Trump's policies, as well as those that have been organizing their communities for years, to quickly mobilize, train, and act for social justice.

Here is what we learned from that effort.

First, with flexible, no-strings-attached funding, innovative mobilizations can materialize overnight in response to the kinds of regressive policies being pushed by the White House.

In Texas, after the state government passed a bill that would ban sanctuary cities and endanger tens of thousands of immigrants — Emergent Fund grantee Jolt Texas sprang into action and staged a "Quinceañera at the Capitol" that brought teenage girls in beautiful Quinceañera ball gowns to the steps of the state capitol and rallied thousands of new and old supporters around a message that speaks to our core American values. The event quickly went viral online, got more than a million RSVPs, and drove new members and energy into Jolt's immigrant rights work across the state.

In the wake of a series of ICE raids in January, Emergent Fund also made a grant to the Texas Organizing Project (TOP) in support of a rapid-response plan that helped a coalition of immigrant-rights groups fight the state's proposed anti-sanctuary cities bill neighborhood by neighborhood.

For both efforts to succeed, we had to mobilize our funding quickly and do it without strings attached, allowing both Jolt and TOP to collect and use the funds without having to file detailed proposals or grant reports, enabling them to focus, instead, on the threat at hand and on mobilizing new supporters.

Another lesson learned: marginalized voices often are not heard in national media conversations because organizers working on issues that affect marginalized groups often find it difficult to secure funding.

As threats to DACA heated up over the last couple of months, for instance, organizations like the National Korean American Service & Education Consortium (NAKASEC), realized that a key demographic was missing from the conversation. While Trump's anti-immigrant rhetoric has been directed, for the most part, at Latinos and Muslims, more than 130,000 young people eligible for DACA are Asian Americans. Likewise, other Emergent Fund grantees came out in full force — Movimiento Cosecha organized an emotional sit-in outside Trump Tower in New York; United We Dream held protests across the country and organized know-your-rights clinics and published resources for Dreamers and their families; and Mijente staged a creative protest outside the Department of Justice. And as the threat of deportation became more real, many joined dozens of immigrant-rights groups for a 24/7 vigil in front of the White House that has been going since August 15.

More than 86 percent of Americans support DACA and the Dreamers, and this kind of organizing is essential, in that it gives new supporters an opportunity to engage more deeply in the fight for justice.

When we launched the Emergent Fund, we were inundated with proposals that had the potential to create real impact but required fast and flexible support. And within six months, we had granted $1 million to fifty diverse organizations on the front lines of the resistance.

In the process, we learned that our model works, that it infuses energy into organizations we've supported for years in more traditional ways, and that $1 million isn't nearly enough to meet the urgency of the moment.

We challenge all philanthropists and donors to join us at this moment of crisis for 800,000 Dreamers who have only done what they were asked and expected to do. Innovative mobilization efforts need your funding, and they need it now. As donors who believe in social justice, we need to show up, with humility, and to trust in the communities that are fighting for their future.

We have an opportunity to empower communities and bring our nation together, and the philanthropic community has an important role to play in that effort. The time is now. The future cannot wait.

Donna_p_hall_for_PhilanTopicDonna P. Hall is president and CEO of the Women Donors Network, a community of more than two hundred progressive women donors who invest their energy, strategic savvy, and philanthropic dollars to help build a more just and fair world.

Harvey Relief: Individual Pledges/Commitments (Table 1.4)

September 09, 2017

Biblical. That's the word that best describes the rainfall visited on Houston and southeastern Texas by Harvey, the Category 4 hurricane that slammed into Texas on August 25. The storm meandered over the region for four days, dumping up to forty inches of rain in many places and over fifty in some, becoming the wettest tropical storm ever to hit the contiguous United States.

The catastrophic flooding that followed displaced nearly 40,000 people, prompted more than 17,000 rescues, and damaged over 200,000 homes (of which 12,700 were destroyed). The storm also caused at least 70 deaths and as much as $180 billion in damage, making it one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history.

Support for relief and recovery efforts began to pour in within forty-eight hours and continued at an impressive clip for the next ten days. Here at the Foundation Center, our colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato have been tracking the corporate response, and thanks to their efforts, we're able to provide some good detail on more than $28 million from celebrities, sports figures, and wealthy individuals (see Table 1.4 below). We've also tracked nearly $189 million in corporate pledges/commitments of cash and product donations (Table 1.1), more than $58 million in foundation contributions (including $10 million from the United Arab Emirates) (Table 1.2), and over $9 million in public charity pledges/commitments (Table 1.3) — for a total, as of September 9, of almost $285 million ($284,911,000) pledged or committed to Harvey relief and recovery by private individuals and the private sector. Impressive.

We realize we haven't captured every dollar committed to relief and recovery efforts — and are aware that a lot of individual contributions have flowed into J.J. Watt's Houston Flood Relief Fund that may not be represented in our tables — but we do think this is as comprehensive accounting as you're likely to find. We encourage you to send us additional information as you encounter it and/or corrections to the information posted below. You can email that info (and any questions you might have) to Mitch at mfn@foundationcenter.org.)

As we're posting this, powerful Hurricane Irma, which has already flattened Barbuda and caused serious damage to Antigua, St. Martin/St. Maarten, and parts of the British Virgin Islands, has the Florida Keys and south Florida in its sights. Our thoughts are with everyone in the region who was not able to evacuate (or chose to ride the storm out in place). We'll be back on Monday with updates as the damage reports start to roll in.

[We're continuing to update the table as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates; see also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief and for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake].

Table 1.1 (Corp.) | Table 1.2 (Fdns) | Table 1.3 (PCs) | Table 1.4 (Inds)

Table 1.4: Individuals

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
Leslie Alexander NBA owner Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $4,000,000  
Odell Beckham, Jr.  Pro football player Americares, Samaritan's Purse $100,000  
Chris Brown Musician American Red Cross $100,000  
Sandra Bullock Actor American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Charles Butt Businessman Houston Flood Relief Fund $5,000,000  
Jim Crane (Houston Astros) Businessman Houston Flood Relief Fund $4,000,000  
Ellen DeGeneres, Ellen DeGeneres Show Entertainer American Red Cross, SPCA Texas, Unknown Recipient(s) $75,000 American Red Cross ($25,000), SPCA Texas ($25,000)
Jimmy Fallon, The Tonight Show Entertainer Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
James Harden Pro basketball player Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Kevin Hart Actor American Red Cross $25,000  
Kieu Hoang Businessman Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $5,000,000  
Huntsman Family Business Beaumont Foundation $1,000,000 To launch Huntsman Flood Fund
Kardashian-Jenner Family Family Reality TV personalities American Red Cross, Salvation Army $100,000  
DJ Khalid Record producer American Red Cross $25,000  
Kroenke Family American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Nicki Minaj Musician Houston Flood Relief Fund $25,000  
McNair Family (Houston Texans) NFL owner United Way of Greater Houston Relief Fund $2,000,000  
Paul Simon and Edie Brickell Musicians Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000  
Amy Adams Strunk (Tennessee Titans) NFL owner Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Donald Trump POTUS Multiple Recipients $1,000,000  
J.J. Watt Pro football player Houston Flood Relief Fund $100,000  
Chris Young Musician American Red Cross $100,000  
    TOTAL: $33,575,000  

 

September 15, 2017

Businessman Kieu Hoang pledges $5 million to the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund.

Updated individual total: $33,575,000


Harvey Relief: Public Charity Commitments (Table 1.3)

Biblical. That's the word that best describes the rainfall visited on Houston and southeastern Texas by Harvey, the Category 4 hurricane that slammed into Texas on August 25. The storm meandered over the region for four days, dumping up to forty inches of rain in many places and over fifty in some, becoming the wettest tropical storm ever to hit the contiguous United States.

The catastrophic flooding that followed displaced nearly 40,000 people, prompted more than 17,000 rescues, and damaged over 200,000 homes (of which 12,700 were destroyed). The storm also caused at least 70 deaths and as much as $180 billion in damage, making it one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history.

Support for relief and recovery efforts began to pour in within forty-eight hours and continued at an impressive clip for the next ten days. Here at the Foundation Center, our colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato have been tracking the corporate response, and thanks to their efforts, we're able to provide some good detail on more than $9 million in public charity pledges/commitments (see Table 1.3 below). We've also tracked nearly $189 million in corporate pledges/commitments of cash and product donations (Table 1.1), more than $58 million in foundation contributions (including $10 million from the United Arab Emirates) (Table 1.2), and over $43 million from celebrities, sports figures, and wealthy individuals (Table 1.4) — for a total, as of September 9, of almost $3000 million ($299,934,500) pledged or committed to Harvey relief and recovery by private individuals and the private sector. Impressive.

We realize we haven't captured every dollar committed to relief and recovery efforts — and are aware that a lot of individual contributions have flowed into J.J. Watt's Houston Flood Relief Fund that may not be represented in our tables — but we do think this is as comprehensive accounting as you're likely to find. We encourage you to send us additional information as you encounter it and/or corrections to the information posted below. You can email that info (and any questions you might have) to Mitch at mfn@foundationcenter.org.)

As we're posting this, powerful Hurricane Irma, which has already flattened Barbuda and caused serious damage to Antigua, St. Martin/St. Maarten, and parts of the British Virgin Islands, has the Florida Keys and south Florida in its sights. Our thoughts are with everyone in the region who was not able to evacuate (or chose to ride the storm out in place). We'll be back on Monday with updates as the damage reports start to roll in.

[We're continuing to update the table as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates; see also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief and for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake].

Table 1.1 (Corp.) | Table 1.2 (Fdns) | Table 1.3 (PCs)| Table 1.4 (Inds)

Table 4: Public Charities

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
American Jewish Committee Public Charity Multiple Recipients $34,000  
Baptist Health Foundation of San Antonio Public Charity Texas Baptist Men, Salvation Army $100,000  
CHS Caregivers Fund Public Charity Diocese of Rockville Centre Hurricane Harvey Fund $100,000  
Direct Relief International Public Charity Unknown Recipient $200,000 Also entire current inventories worth $100 million made available
Henry Schein, Inc. Public Charity Multiple Recipients $500,000 Cash, in-kind and employee match
Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, Inc. Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000  
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Up to $1 million in direct support to help blood cancer patients in affected communities
NFL Foundation, Inc. Public Charity United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000 Matching Houston Texans donation
PETCO Foundation Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $2,300,000 All For Saving Lives fund raising campaign in Petco stores and online through September 10
PetSmart Charities, Inc. Public Charity Multiple Recipients $2,000,000 To animal welfare agencies; also pet food and supplies
Scholarship America, Inc. Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000 For college students affected by Harvey
    TOTAL: $9,634,000  

 

September 15, 2017

Scholarship America, Inc. announces a $200,000 donation to unknown recipient(s) in support of college students affected by Harvey.

Updated public charity total: $9,634,000


Harvey Relief: Foundation Pledges/Commitments (Table 1.2)

Biblical. That's the word that best describes the rainfall visited on Houston and southeastern Texas by Harvey, the Category 4 hurricane that slammed into Texas on August 25. The storm meandered over the region for four days, dumping up to forty inches of rain in many places and over fifty in some, becoming the wettest tropical storm ever to hit the contiguous United States.

The catastrophic flooding that followed displaced nearly 40,000 people, prompted more than 17,000 rescues, and damaged over 200,000 homes (of which 12,700 were destroyed). The storm also caused at least 70 deaths and as much as $180 billion in damage, making it one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history.

Support for relief and recovery efforts began to pour in within forty-eight hours and continued at an impressive clip for the next ten days. Here at the Foundation Center, our colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato have been tracking the corporate response, and thanks to their efforts, we're able to provide some good detail on more than $58 million in foundation contributions (including $10 million from the United Arab Emirates) (see Table 1.2 below). We've also tracked nearly $189 million in corporate pledges/commitments of cash and product donations (Table 1.1), over $9 million from public charities (Table 1.3), and more than $28 million from celebrities, sports figures, and wealthy individuals (Table 1.4) — for a total, as of September 9, of almost $285 million ($284,911,000) pledged or committed to Harvey relief and recovery by private individuals and the private sector. Impressive.

We realize we haven't captured every dollar committed to relief and recovery efforts — and are aware that a lot of individual contributions have flowed into J.J. Watt's Houston Flood Relief Fund that may not be represented in our tables — but we do think this is as comprehensive accounting as you're likely to find. We encourage you to send us additional information as you encounter it and/or corrections to the information posted below. You can email that info (and any questions you might have) to Mitch at mfn@foundationcenter.org.)

As we're posting this, powerful Hurricane Irma, which has already flattened Barbuda and caused serious damage to Antigua, St. Martin/St. Maarten, and parts of the British Virgin Islands, has the Florida Keys and south Florida in its sights. Our thoughts are with everyone in the region who was not able to evacuate (or chose to ride the storm out in place). We'll be back on Monday with updates as the damage reports start to roll in.

[We're continuing to update the table as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates; see also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief and for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake].

Table 1.1 (Corp.) | Table 1.2 (Fdns) | Table 1.3 (PCs) | Table 1.4 (Inds)

Table 2: Independent, Family, Community Foundations

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
Micky and Madeleine Arison Family Foundation Family Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 To be split evenly among Direct Relief, Houston Food Bank, Operation Homefront, Save the Children, and United Way of Greater Houston
Laura and John Arnold Foundation Family Foundation Greater Houston Community Foundation $5,000,000  
Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation Family Foundation Greater Houston Community Foundation $100,000  
Arthur M. Blank Foundation Family Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Matching fund for victims of both Harvey and Irma
Bohemian Foundation Independent Foundation NoCo Hurricane Harvey Recovery Fund $2,000,000 1:1 match up to $2 million for donations made by individuals, businesses, and corporate donors in Larimer and Weld County, Colorado
Boston Foundation, Inc. Community Foundation Greater Houston Community Foundation $25,000  
Michael & Susan Dell Foundation Family Foundation Rebuild Texas Fund $36,000,000 To launch Rebuild Texas Fund ($18 million); 1:2 text match campaign (up to $18 million)
Leonardo Di Caprio Foundation Independent Foundation United Way Harvey Recovery Fund $1,000,000  
Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Family Foundation Unknown Recipient $500,000  
Huntsman Foundation Family Foundation Beaumont Foundation $1,000,000 To launch Huntsman Flood Fund
J. Willard and Alice S. Marriott Foundation Family Foundation American Red Cross $250,000  
Taube Philanthropies Family Foundation All Hands Volunteers $1,000,000 Jewish community needs ($100,000)
United Arab Emirates Sovereign fund Multiple Recipients $10,000,000 Embassy officials will coordinate with state/local leaders about specific relief and recovery efforts
Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation Family Foundation Houston Food Bank, Jewish Family Services (JFS) of Houston, Mission Continues, Team Rubicon $500,000  
    TOTAL: $59,375,000  

 

September 15, 2017

The Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation announces a $100,000 donation to the Greater Houston Community Foundation Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund.

Updated foundation total: $59,375,000


Harvey Relief: Corporate Pledges/Commitments (Table 1.1)

Biblical. That's the word that best describes the rainfall visited on Houston and southeastern Texas by Harvey, the Category 4 hurricane that slammed into Texas on August 25. The storm meandered over the region for four days, dumping up to forty inches of rain in many places and over fifty in some, becoming the wettest tropical storm ever to hit the contiguous United States.

The catastrophic flooding that folloFwed displaced nearly 40,000 people, prompted more than 17,000 rescues, and damaged over 200,000 homes (of which 12,700 were destroyed). The storm also caused at least 70 deaths and as much as $180 billion in damage, making it one of the deadliest and costliest hurricanes in U.S. history.

Support for relief and recovery efforts began to pour in within forty-eight hours and continued at an impressive clip for the next ten days. Here at the Foundation Center, our colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato have been tracking the corporate response, and thanks to their efforts, we're able to provide some good detail on nearly $189 million in corporate pledges/commitments of cash and product donations (see Table 1.1 below). We've also tracked more than $58 million in foundation contributions (including $10 million from the United Arab Emirates) (Table 1.2), over $9 million from public charities (Table 1.3), and more than $28 million from celebrities, sports figures, and wealthy individuals (Table 1.4) — for a total, as of September 9, of almost $285 million ($284,911,000) pledged or committed to Harvey relief and recovery by private individuals and the private sector. Impressive.

We realize we haven't captured every dollar committed to relief and recovery efforts — and are aware that a lot of individual contributions have flowed into J.J. Watt's Houston Flood Relief Fund that may not be represented in our tables — but we do think this is as comprehensive accounting as you're likely to find. We encourage you to send us additional information as you encounter it and/or corrections to the information posted below. You can email that info (and any questions you might have) to Mitch at mfn@foundationcenter.org.)

As we're posting this, powerful Hurricane Irma, which has already flattened Barbuda and caused serious damage to Antigua, St. Martin/St. Maarten, and parts of the British Virgin Islands, has the Florida Keys and south Florida in its sights. Our thoughts are with everyone in the region who was not able to evacuate (or chose to ride the storm out in place). We'll be back on Monday with updates as the damage reports start to roll in.

[We're continuing to update the table as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates; see also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated specifically for Hurricane Irma relief and for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake].

Table 1.1 (Corp.) | Table 1.2 (Fdns) | Table 1.3 (PCs) | Table 1.4 (Inds)

Table 1: Company-Sponsored Foundations, Corporate Giving Programs

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
Aaron's, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $145,000 Employee donations ($45,000)
Abbott Fund, Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Value of donated healthcare and nutrition products ($100,000
Abbvie Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000  
Academy, Ltd. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $2,500,000 Value of unified command center and shelter for first responders
AdvoCare International L.P. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Employee and customer match ($50,000)
Agropur, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $25,000  
Ahold USA (Stop & Shop, Giant Food of Landover, and Giant Food Stores of Carlisle) Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $250,000 Cash ($175,000), in-kind ($75,000)
AkzoNobel, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $250,000 American Red Cross ($50,000), Hurricane Harvey Disaster relief Fund ($50,000), misc. recipient ($50,000), employee match ($100,000) $50,000 to Hurricane Harvey Disaster Relief Fund, $50,000 to miscellaneous recip, $100,000 employee match"
Albertsons Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $200,000 Customer match
Allergan Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Allstate Foundation, Company Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $750,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts; includes employee and agency owners match ($500,000), student match ($250,000)
Amegy Bank of Texas Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program United Way Flood Relief Fund $850,000  
Ameren Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also employee contributions
American Express Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 For immediate disaster relief ($150,00), employee match ($100,000)
American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
American International Group (AIG) Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Center for Disaster Philanthropy $1,000,000 Immediate needs ($500,000), medium- and longer-term recovery efforts ($500,000)
AmerisourceBergen Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts
Amway Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, International Red Cross $250,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts, including in Caribbean; also in-kind donations
Anadarko Petroleum Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Andeavor Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, San Antonio Food Bank, Houston Food Bank, Texas Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters, Team Rubicon, Salvation Army, Coastal Bend Community Foundation’s Disaster Recovery Fund, Greater Houston Community Foundation’s Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, One Star Foundation  (Abbott’s Rebuild Texas Fund), Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Employee match ($100,000)
Andersen Corporate Foundation, Corporation Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Houston Habitat for Humanity $175,000 Employee match ($25,000), value of donated windows and doors ($100,000)
Associa Cares, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $50,000  
AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Americares $100,000 Also employee match and product donations as needed
Apple Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $5,000,000 Incudes additional $3 million for relief efforts benefiting people affected by Harvey and Irma
Assurant Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
AT&T Foundation, Corporate Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Greater Houston Community Fund, American Red Cross, Coastal Bend Community Foundation, Multiple Recipients $300,000 Employee match ($50,000)
Atlanta Braves Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Programs American Red Cross $25,000  
Atlanta Falcons (NFL)/Atlanta United (MLS) Corporate Giving Programs American Red Cross, United Way, World Vision $1,000,000 To be split by the three organizations
Avangrid Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $50,000  
Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000  
Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Employee match ($750,000)
Bayer Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $750,000  
BB&T Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $750,000
BBVA Compass Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $325,000 $75,000 employee match; will also raise $250,000 in employee and customer contributions
BD Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Americares, TBD $700,000 For victims of Harvey and Irma; $100,000 employee match for Americares; $600,000 in cash and product donations to TBD
Bechtel Group Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also employee match
BMO Financial Group Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Boehringer Ingelheim Cares Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $125,000 Corporate contributions and employee match. Also product donations
Boeing Company Charitable Trust Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match ($100,000)
BP America Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $750,000 Also employee match through foundation
Bridgestone Americas, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Programs American Red Cross $1,000,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts
Campbell Soup Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Feeding America, Multiple Recipients $160,000 Value of product donations ($85,000), employee match ($25,000)
Camping World, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000 Match. Also product donations
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000  
Canadian National Railway Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Louisiana Red Cross $75,000 $25,000 for employee match
Cargill, Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Also employee giving via payroll deduction ($150,000), value of 150,000 tons of donated animal feed ($100,000)
CarMax, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match from CarMAx Foundation
Carnival Cruise Line, Carnival Foundation Corporate Giving Program, Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 To be split among Direct Relief, Houston Food Bank, Operation Homefront, Save the Children, and United Way of Greater Houston
Casey's General Stores, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Employee match
Caterpillar Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $300,000  
CEMEX, S.A.B. de C.V. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000  
CenterPoint Energy Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, United Way of Greater Houston $1,250,000 Includes $250,000 each to the three named recipients
Century Communities Corporate Giving Program Houston Food Bank, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $500,000 Houston Food Bank ($125,000), Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund ($125,000)
Charter Communications, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Value of donated public service announcements
Cheniere Energy, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Chevron Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee match
Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston $750,000 Employee match ($250,000)
CH2M HILL Companies Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $70,000  
Cigna Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Cincinnati Reds LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $40,000  
Cisco Systems Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $1,000,000 Employee match ($500,000 - up to $10k per employee)
Citi Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000  
CITGO Petroleum Corp. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, Unknown Recipient(s) $5,000,000</a Part of a fund of up to $5 million set aside to provide aid to those affected
Coach Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $200,000 Also employee match
Comerica Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Conn's, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000 Match
ConocoPhillips Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, United Way of Greater Houston $5,000,000 $1.5 million to Red Cross in addition to earlier $1 million gift
Continental Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 Employee donations ($25,000)
Covestro LLC Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee contributions
Crestwood Equity Partners Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross of Greater Houston $125,000 Red Cross of Greater Houston ($100,000), Matagorda County ($25,000)
CUNA Mutual Group Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program CUAid $50,000 For affected employees
Cushman & Wakefield Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 Employee match ($50,000)
CVS Health Foundation, Corporation Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Salvation Army, Unknown Recipient(s) $175,000 Employee match ($25,000), Value of donated products
Daimler AG Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 On behalf of U.S. subsidiaries
Dallas Cowboys Football Club, Ltd. Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston's Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Dell Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000 Also employee match
DentaQuest Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Michael & Susan Dell Foundation Rebuild Texas Fund $1,000,000  
DENSO North America Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $50,000  
D.G. Yuengling & Son, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 For Harvey/Irma relief
Diageo North America, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000 Cash, supplies, and water
Dick's Sporting Goods Foundation, Dick's Sporting Goods, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program DonorsChoose.org, American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $5,500,000 $1 million for community youth sports leagues, teams, organizations affected by Harvey/Irma; $1 million for up to $25,000 for eligible schools' sports programs; $3.5 million in donated clothing and footwear
Direct Energy, LP Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Employee match
Discover Financial Services Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,500,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts ($1 million); cardmember donation matching program ($500,000)
Dollar General Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 For relief and recovery efforts across Texas and Louisiana
Dollar Tree, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 Affected employees ($250,000)
Dominion Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $75,000  
Dow Chemical Company Foundation, Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Multiple Recipients $1,100,000 Employee match ($100,000)
E. & J. Gallo Winery Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee match and product donations
Entergy Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 Also employee match
Enterprise Rent-A-Car Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Exelon Corporation Contributions Program, Exelon Foundation Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $350,000  
Exxon Mobil Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $8,500,000 Employee match ($6,000,000), value of In-kind donations ($2,500,000)
Facebook, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program CDP Hurricane Harvey Recovery Fund $1,000,000  
FCA US LLC, FCA Foundation Corporate Giving Program, Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $200,000 Americares ($50,000), First Response Team of America and Team Rubicon ($75,000)
Federal Home Loan Bank of Dallas Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $7,000,000 Grants ($6.7 million), member donations ($275,000)
FedEx Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and value of transportation support to deliver critical medical aid and supplies
FirstEnergy Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $75,000 Employee match ($50,000)
Ford Motor Company Fund Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $150,000 $50,000 for employee match for American Red Cross
Foresters Financial Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
Fortis Inc. and ITC Holdings Corp Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Friedkin Group Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Relief Fund $500,000  
Frontier Communications<.strong> Corporate Giving Program Rebuild Texas Fund $1,000,000  
Frost Bank Charitable Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,100,000 Match (up to $100,000 for affected employees)
FULLBEAUTY Brands, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Delivering Good $300,000 In-kind
Gap Foundation, Gap, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Includes a cash grant from Gap Foundation, donations from Gap Inc. brands, and employee-matched donations
General Electric Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000 Also employee match
General Mills, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Feeding America, American Red Cross $150,000 Employee match ($50,000)
GoFundMe Corporate Giving Program Direct Impact Fund $100,000  
Google.org Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,750,000 Google.org and employee contributions
Guy and O'Neill Inc. Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $200,000 In-kind donation of diapers
H. E. Butt Grocery Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 Also customer contributions
HanesBrands Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $2,250,000 In-kind to Delivering Good and Glen Raven Logistics ($2,000,000 ), American Red Cross ($25,000)
Hanmi Bank Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000  
HCA Healthcare Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, HCA Hope Fund $2,000,000  
Hercules Capital, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000  
Hess Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $1,000,000 Also employee match
Hilltop Holdings Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 Also employee contributions
Hilton Worldwide Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000  
Home Depot Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Salvation Army, Convoy of Hope, Operation Blessing and Team Rubicon $2,000,000 For short-term relief and rebuilding needs; includes additional commitment of $1 million to support hurricane relief efforts
Honeywell Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000  
Houston Texans Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Humana Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000  
Hyundai Motor America Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Multiple Recipients $500,000 $200,000 for five children's hospitals in Texas; $300,000 to American Red Cross for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.
IBM Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $2,000,000 Cash and value of in-kind technology and services
Intel Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Employee match
Intercontinental Exchange, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee match
International Paper Company Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Feeding America $1,000,000  
J.C. Penney Company, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also help to affected J.C. Penney employees from the Golden Rule Relief Fund
Jefferies Group, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Also pledged to donate all net trading commissions from trading on Wednesday, August 30
Johns Manville Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
JPMorgan Chase & Co. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients (Red Cross and others) $1,000,000 Also employee match
Kaiser Permanente Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Mental Health America of Greater Houston $1,000,000  
Kansas City Southern Charitable Fund Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $75,000 Employee match ($25,000)
KBR, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program KBR Charitable Foundation Disaster Relief Fund $500,000 For employees affected by Harvey
Kellogg Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Feeding America $100,000  
KeyBank Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Houston Food Bank $100,000  
Kia Motors America, Inc. Contributions Program, Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $300,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts
Kinder Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Kindred Healthcare, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
Kohl's Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $2,000,000 Aid to Kohl's employees ($1,000,000)
Kroger Co Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Houston Food Bank $100,000 For every social share of the #KrogerCares post, the foundation will donate $5 to the food bank, up to $100,000. Also, customer contributions
Kubota Tractor Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and product donations
Lee's Sandwiches Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $100,000  
Lennar Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000 Also employee match
Lexmark International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 Employee match ($20,000)
Lockheed Martin Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $380,000  
Louisiana-Pacific Corporation Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 American Red Cross, Salvation Army, and the United Way of Greater Houston Relief Fund ($500,000), in-kind ($500,000)
Lowe's Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000  
Lundbeck Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, American Epilepsy Society, National Alliance on Mental Illness, Alzheimer’s Association, Parkinson’s Foundation $135,000 Includes $10,000 for employee match; $25,000 each for the five organizations
Lyft, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Greater Houston Community Foundation $100,000 Also customer contributions to Red Cross
LyondellBasell North America Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000  
M&T Bank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Employee match ($100,000)
Macquarie Group Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Macy's Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Major League Baseball Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 Jointly with MLB Players Association
Marriott International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also customer donations
MasterCard Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also waiving any interchange related to donations to specific charities
Mattress Firm, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000 Value of product, customer donations
Mazda North American Operations Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Together with foundation
McDonald's Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,250,000 Employee match ($250,000)
McKesson Foundation, Corporate Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation, Corporate Giving Program Direct Relief, World Vision $250,000 Value of product donations, also employee match ($100,000)
Merck & Co., Corporate Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund, Multiple Recipient(s) $1,250,000 For Harvey/Irma, also product donations
Michael Kors Holdings Ltd. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000  
Microsoft Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
MillerCoors LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also 50,000 cans of drinking water to Red Cross
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $300,000</a  
Mizuho Financial Group, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Habitat for Humanity $100,000  
Motiva Enterprises LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000  
Nationwide Insurance Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000  
NBCUniversal, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Value of advertising time ($500,000?)
New England Patriots LP Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Match
New York Community Bank Corporate Giving Program Team Rubicon $25,000 For hurricane relief efforts in the United States
New York Life Insurance Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Feeding Texas, Save the Children $350,000  
Nexstar Media Group, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Nexstar for Texas $2,500,000  
NextEra Energy, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match ($100,000)
Norbord Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Home Builders Institute $1,000,000 For training and educating new construction professionals to help rebuild after Irma and Harvey
Norfolk Southern Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Food Bank of Houston $100,000  
Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,100,000 Includes $1,000,000 in in-kind donations
Novo Nordisk Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Houston Health Foundation $150,000 Also employee match to American Red Cross
NRG Energy, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $2,000,000 Value of in-kind donations and assistance ($1,000,000)
NuStar Energy L.P. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Salvation Army, San Antonio Food Bank $250,000  
Olin Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also product donations
Oncor Electric Delivery Company, LLC Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
ONEOK Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 For employees in need ($200,000)
Orbital ATK Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $100,000  
Pacific Gas & Electric Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000 Employee match
Panda Cares Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Tzu-Chi Foundation $1,000,000  
Patterson Companies Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $70,000  
PenFed Credit Union Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
Pentair Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $25,000 Also employee match
PepsiCo Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also Aquafina purified drinking water from local business units
Pet Supermarket, Pet Valu Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 In-kind
Phillips 66 Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Rebuild Texas Fund, United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $4,000,000
Pioneer Natural Resources Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
PNC Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $350,000 Employee match ($100,00)
Publix Super Markets, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee and customer contributions
Qualcomm Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For long-term recovery ($500,000), employee match ($250,000)
QVC, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Customer match ($100,000), employee match ($25,000)
Range Resources Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Red Wing Shoe Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Good360 $500,000 Product donations
Regions Financial Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $100,000  
Renaissance Family Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $25,000  
Reynolds American Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $150,000  
Rite-Aid Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 Employee match to American Red Cross ($50,000), in-kind ($20,000)
Rooms to Go Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $2,000,000 Also product donations
Ross Stores, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $400,000 Also customer contributions
Royal Bank of Canada Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Samsung Electronics America, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Donated products ($500,000)
Sanofi Foundation for North America Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $225,000 Also employee match to American Red Cross
Santander US Corporate Giving Program Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, American Red Cross $100,000  
Schneider Electric Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Scholastic Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000  
Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $150,000 Also price reduction and expedited shipping for products bound for the affected areas
Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Zina Garrison Tennis & Education Academy $100,000  
Sealed Air Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $125,000 Employee match ($25,000); also in-kind donations to NGOs
SecureView, LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Sempra Energy Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Americares, Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000  
Shell Oil Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Shiner Beers Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000  
Sinclair Broadcasting Group (and affiliates) Corporate Giving Program Salvation Army $1,450,000  
Southern Company Charitable Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee match
Southwest Airlines Co. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 Also donated 100 round-trip tickets to Houston for Team Rubicon responders
Spectrum Housing Assist Corporate Giving Program Rebuilding Together $350,000 To assist with home repairs and renovations
Stage Stores, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $750,000  
Stanley Black & Decker, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Houston ToolBank $75,000 Also a 2:1 employee match, in-kind donations
Starbucks Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee match
Strada Education Network Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000  
Stream Cares Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000  
SubscriberWise, Ltd. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Americares $2,500  
Suntory Holdings Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 For recovery efforts in communities affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma
SunTrust Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Sutter Health Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000  
Target Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $3,500,000 Includes in-kind gifts
Taylor Morrison Home Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also employee and customer contributions
TD Ameritrade Holding Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 Employee and customer match
TD Charitable Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $125,000  
TechnipFMC plc Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $1,000,000  
Tegna Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 Employee match
Tempur Sealy International, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Good360 $1,000,000 Value of bed donations
Tenet Healthcare Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $20,000  
Texas Rangers Baseball Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Also donating proceeds from 9/1-9/3 games
Texas Instruments Incorporated Contributions Program Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $200,000 Employee match ($100,000)
Tokio Marine Holdings, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, All Hands Volunteers $250,000  
Toronto-Dominion Bank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000  
Total Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000  
Toyota Motor North America, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $3,000,000  
TransCanada Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 Also employee and customer match
The Travelers Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000  
Tribune Media Company Charitable Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, American Red Cross $100,000  
TXU Energy Retail Company LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 Assist customers who need help paying their electric bills in areas hit by Hurricane Harvey
UBS Financial Services Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $250,000 Also employee match
Under Armour, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Team Rubicon $50,000  
Union Pacific Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, Unknown Recipient(s) $250,000 Employee match ($100,000)
United Air Lines, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, AmeriCares, Airlink or Operation USA $100,000 Match first $100,000 donated by MilagePlus members via United's fundraising page
United Rentals, Inc. Contributions Program, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000  
UnitedHealth Group Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000  
Univision Communications, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $500,000 American Red Cross, Catholic Charities USA, and Texas Diaper Bank ($250,000), in-kind services
UPS Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000  
USANA True Health Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $130,000  
USTA Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient $500,000  
Valero Energy Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000  
ValueMomentum, Inc. Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Team Rubicon $50,000  
Vectren Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients, Unknown Recipient(s) $75,000 Employee match ($25,000)
Verizon Communications Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $12,550,000 To four nonprofit agencies TBD; $2,500,000 to Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund; $50,000 to Texas Council on Family Violence for agencies affected by Harvey
Visa Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $250,000 Also will double-match employee donations to Red Cross
Vistra Energy Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Also clothing and toiletries
Vitol Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee contributions
Vizient Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Corp contributions and employee match. Also employee, member, and supplier contributions
VSP Global Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $5,025,000 $25,000 for employee match; $5 million for VSP network doctors whose businesses have been damaged by Irma and Harvey
Walgreens Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Also donating food items, first aid, and medical equipment
Walmart, Walmart Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Multiple Recipients $30,000,000 ARC shelters (up to $10 million), GHCF ($2 million); includes second 2:1 customer match of cash and product donations up to $10 million ($20 million total)
Walt Disney Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000  
Waste Management, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $3,000,000  
Watercrest Senior Living Group, LLC Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Samaritan's Purse, Unknown Recipient(s) $110,000 Fundraising campaign ($100,000)
Waterton Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $50,000  
Wawanesa Mutual Insurance Company Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $10,000  
Weatherford International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Feeding Texas, Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund $50,000  
Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For local nonprofits ($500,000)
Whataburger Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Whataburger Family Foundation, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,650,000 Affected local employees ($1,000,000), Local food banks ($50,000)
Williams Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program United Way of Greater Houston Flood Relief Fund $500,000  
Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $2,600,000 Cash and in-kind
Wynn Resorts, Limited Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $3,750,000  
Xcel Energy Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000  
Xerox Corporation Contributions Program/strong> Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $100,000 $25,000 each for Harvey and Irma relief, $50,000 employee match
Yara North America, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $100,000 For Harvey/Irma relief efforts
Yardi Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Plus employee match
    TOTAL: $233,552,500  

 

September 11, 2017

Atlanta Falcons (NFL)/Atlanta United (MLS) announce joint contribution of $1 million to help victims of Harvey and Irma, to be split by American Red Cross, United Way, and World Vision.

Apple announces additional $3 million for relief efforts benefiting people affected by Harvey and Irma.

Home Depot Foundation announces additional commitment of $1 million to support hurricane relief efforts, raising total financial support to $2 million for hurricane aid this season.

Walmart announces a second $10 million 2:1 customer match of cash and product donations to support American Red Cross disaster-response efforts.

Updated corporate total: $203,827,500

 

September 12, 2017

Discover Financial Services, which previously had pledged $500,000 to the American Red Cross as part of a cardmember donation matching program, announces additional $1 million pledge to the Red Cross in support of Irma and Harvey relief efforts.

New York Community Bank announces a commitment of $25,000 to Team Rubicon for hurricane relief efforts.

Suntory Holdings announces $1 million donation to American Red Cross for recovery efforts in communities affected by Harvey or Irma.

Updated corporate total: $205,852,500

 

September 15, 2017

The BD Corporate Giving Program announces an employee match, cash, and product donations totaling $700,000 to Americares and organizations TBD for victims of both Harvey and Irma.

The Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program announces a $100,000 pledge to Zina Garrison Tennis & Education Academy.

The BP America Corporate Giving Program announces a $750,000 pledge in support of Harvey relief efforts.

The DentaQuest Corporate Giving Program announces a $1 million pledge to the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation's Rebuild Texas Fund.

Dick's Sporting Goods Foundation and Dick's Sporting Goods, Inc. Corporate Giving Program announce cash and product donations totaling $5.5 million for sports programs affected by Harvey and Irma.

The DentaQuest Corporate Giving Program announces a $1 million pledge to the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation's Rebuild Texas Fund.

The KBR, Inc. Contributions Program announces a commitment of $50,000 to the KBR Charitable Foundation Disaster Relief Fund in support of employees affected by Harvey.

The Merck & Co., Inc. Corporate Giving Program announces a pledge of $1 million to the Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund and $250,000 to multiple recipients for Harvey/Irma relief.

The Red Wing Shoe Company Contributions Program announces product donations worth $500,000 to Good360.

The Rooms to Go Corporate Giving Program announces a $2 million commitment and product donations for Harvey/Irma relief.

The Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program announces a $100,000 pledge to Zina Garrison Tennis & Education Academy.

The Target Corporation, which previously had pledged $500,000, announces an additional $3 million commitment, including in-kind gifts.

The Verizon Communications Inc. Contributions Program, which previously had pledged $10 million, announces additional commitments of $2.5 million and $50,000 to the Texas Council on Family Violence to assist South Texas domestic violence agencies affected by Harvey.

The Xerox Corporation Contributions Program pledges $100,000 to the American Red Cross for Harvey/Irma relief.

Updated corporate total: $220,452,500


September 20, 2017

The Allstate Foundation, which previously pledged $500,000 for Harvey relief efforts, increases its commitment to $750,000 total for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The Amway Corporation Contributions Program announces commitments totaling $250,000 for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP Contributions Program announce a $100,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Bridgestone Americas, Inc. Corporate Giving Program pledges $1 million for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The Ford Motor Company Fund announces a $150,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Kia Motors America, Inc. Contributions Program and Kia Motors Manufacturing Georgia Corporate Giving Program announce commitments totaling $300,000 for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The Lundbeck Corporate Giving Program announces pledges totaling $135,000 for Harvey relief efforts.

The Macquarie Group Foundation announces a $100,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Norbord Corporate Giving Program announces a $1 million commitment for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation Contributions Program announces $1.1 million for Harvey relief efforts.

The Novo Nordisk Inc. Contributions Program announces a $100,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Sanofi Foundation for North America announces a $225,000 commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The VSP Global Corporate Giving Program announces a $150,000 commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The Yara North America, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $100,000 pledge for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $230,437,500


September 22, 2017

The Andeavor Corporation Contributions Program announces a $1 million commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The Atlanta Braves Corporate Giving Program announces a $250,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Bacardi U.S.A., Inc. Contributions Program announces a $500,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Bechtel Group Foundation announces a $1 million commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc. Contributions Program announces a $200,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Cincinnati Reds LLC Contributions Program announces a $40,000 commitment for Harvey relief efforts.

The D.G. Yuengling & Son, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $50,000 pledge for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $232,352,500


September 25, 2017

The Canadian National Railway Company Contributions Program announces a $75,000 pledge for Harvey relief efforts.

The Hyundai Motor America Corporate Giving Program, which had pledged $200,000 for Harvey relief efforts, announces an additional $300,000 commitment for Harvey/Irma relief efforts.

The BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program and BBVA Compass Foundationannounce commitments totaling $825,000 for Harvey relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $233,552,500


Powered by Women: Philanthropy in the Age of Trump Needs to Address Gender

September 08, 2017

Pink_pussy_hatsAttacks on women and gender identity have been central to the policies coming out of the Trump White House. Whether it involves dismantling Title IX, rolling back access to reproductive rights, defunding programs that aim to end gender-based violence, or seeking to ban transgender people from enlisting in the military, this administration has made attacking gender equity a key priority. To respond effectively, the philanthropic sector, too, must make gender justice, in addition to economic and racial justice, a core principle. 

Women have been central to resistance efforts across the country and around the world, with millions participating in Day Without a Woman and the Women's March. In record numbers, more and more of us are becoming engaged in the political process, advocating with state and national elected officials, and running for office. Across the country, ever larger numbers of community leaders are working daily to organize our friends, families, neighbors, and communities. In fact, as I write this, I'm meeting with representatives of hundreds of other women's foundations at the Women's Funding Network conference in San Francisco. All of us are committed to defending democracy, restoring respect, and challenging bigotry, misogyny, and racism.

With the role of gender elevated in our new political normal, philanthropy must address gender and gender issues in its response. Looking to, learning from, and partnering with the women's funding movement will be critical to philanthropy's overall success in the months and years to come. It's a smart and necessary approach because women's foundations:

  • continually engage with and are accountable to the public, listen to our grantee partners and donors, are responsive to the current moment with our program strategies, and pivot quickly as needed;
  • develop and train leaders, building capacity at the local and state levels by supporting leaders who are rooted in their communities;
  • work across issues, making linkages between health, safety, and economic security;
  • are nimble and can deploy money quickly; and
  • can reach small, grassroots organizations, often making the first grants to organizations that go on to be critical to social justice movement advancement.

Today, women's philanthropy is responding to the current political moment in ways that the broader philanthropic sector would be wise to emulate. In this first year of the Trump administration, the women's funding movement is answering the urgent call to step up and support community leaders, centering those who are experiencing attacks, including women, immigrants, people of color, low-wage workers, and LGBT people.

And women's foundations do all this on a dime. When the women's funding movement started in the 1970s, less than 1 percent of all philanthropic dollars went to fund women's and girls' issues. Now, four decades later, that number has grown to somewhere between 7 percent and 9 percent. That's still way too low — especially when one considers the gains associated with investing in gender equity. Research has shown that when we invest in women, the benefits ripple out to families, neighborhoods, communities, and the broader economy.

Collaboration and coordination are key to the way we do our work. Two years ago, twenty-nine women's foundations from across the country gathered at the Obama White House to launch Prosperity Together, a five-year, $100 million commitment to create greater economic security for women and girls of color and low-income women. In the first year of the initiative, we made almost $30 million in grants, surpassing our goal while coordinating our efforts and learning from each other. The broader philanthropic sector can join this already-successful effort by partnering with us and adding resources to the table.

Last year, at the United State of Women Summit in Washington D.C., eight women's foundations came together to launch a Young Women's Initiative modeled on the successful initiative led by the New York Women's Foundation. Through the initiative, women's foundations in Dallas, New York, California, Memphis, Minnesota, Birmingham, western Massachusetts, and Washington, D.C., are raising up the voices of young women and girls of color, including lesbian and trans people of color, and helping to develop solutions that will improve our communities, for everyone.

Policy advocacy is a critical component of achieving systemic change. At the Women's Foundation of California, our Women's Policy Institute has taught more than four hundred and fifty leaders how to advance gender equity through policy change. In turn, these leaders helped pass twenty-nine laws that have improved the health, safety, and economic well-being of millions of people living in California. Among those laws is the Domestic Worker Bill of Rights, which extends overtime protections to an estimated 500,000 domestic workers in the state. (Ninety percent of domestic workers in California are women, while 46 percent are immigrant women.) And this year, we launched a Philanthropy and Public Policy Institute, modeled after the Women's Policy Institute, to teach funders about the public policy process and help them be more effective grantmakers.

In this political moment, we all need to recognize the centrality of gender to our social justice efforts. From community foundations to national grantmakers to individual donors, philanthropy can leverage its resources for tangible, systemic impact in our communities by putting money and trust in women and making gender and racial justice a central part of their giving.

Headshot_Surina-Khan_for-_PhilanTopicSurina Khan is CEO of the Women's Foundation of California. Follow @SurinaKhan and @womensfoundca.

Philanthropy Teams Up With Institutional Investors to Fight Climate Change

September 07, 2017

Carbon_0As the world works to tackle climate change without the leadership of the U.S. government, there's a growing need to connect philanthropy to institutional investors and catalyze change at a pace rapid enough to be meaningful. Because philanthropy typically is associated with nonprofit activity, that combination may sound surprising. But because climate change represents such an extraordinary threat, it's imperative we compress the dynamics of innovation and scale through new approaches.

That's why Planet Heritage Foundation, where I am the executive director, co-created and funded the launch of Aligned Intermediary, a global investment advisory firm that works with institutional investors to channel capital into "climate infrastructure" sectors such as clean energy, water, and waste-to-value. These investors — sovereign funds, pensions, endowments, insurance companies, family offices, and foundations — represent more than $80 trillion in assets and are the only stakeholders other than governments with the capacity to invest at a scale that can begin to slow and, ultimately, reverse the world's spiraling carbon emissions.

With less than 1 percent of institutional capital currently being deployed to the climate infrastructure space, we simply do not have the luxury of letting markets organically dictate the timing of our climate change actions. The climate infrastructure industry needs to be exponentially ramped up over the next five to ten years, and that will require the development of new financial products, business models, and business practices. Put another way, we need to make institutional investing in climate infrastructure as easy and standardized as investing in global real estate — and we need to do it quickly. Patient capital, the kind provided by foundations and philanthropy, will be critical to those efforts, and jumpstarting the flow of it into climate change efforts is crucial.

After only a year, the Aligned Intermediary model is already demonstrating promise in this regard. Led by co-founder and CEO Peter Davidson, who previously ran the U.S. Department of Energy's Loan Programs Office, the organization has secured member commitments totaling $1.45 billion from institutional investors in five countries — the United States, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. Institutions making commitments include the Regents of the University of California, the New Zealand Superannuation Fund, TIAA Global Asset Management, Ontario Public Service Employees Union Trust, the Wellcome Trust, the Church Commissioners for England, the Wafra Investment Advisory Group, the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, and Cbus (in Australia).

The model is an entrepreneurial one, with the founding partners behind it each possessing a necessary asset: Davidson (domain expertise), Ashby Monk (advisory experience in the institutional investing world), and myself (a history of collaborative platforms for social change).

In partnership with Sarah Kearney (PRIME) and Alicia Seiger (Stanford University), we initially attracted grant funding totaling $500,000 from four philanthropies — the Hewlett Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, the ClimateWorks Foundation, and Planet Heritage Foundation — for research that demonstrated the potential of our model. Planet Heritage then funded the first year of Aligned Intermediary's operations as a public benefit corporation with a $1.5 million program-related investment (PRI), which made it possible for Davidson to start assembling a team of experts and analysts.

In the year since it opened for business, Aligned Intermediary has closed two deals and advised on a number of others, resulting in about $150 million in climate change investments. That's an impressive return on our $1.5 million PRI and underscores the potential of the model with respect to climate infrastructure for both philanthropic and institutional investors.

But perhaps most exciting is that the organization almost immediately began receiving requests for opportunities from a broader group of investors — beyond the member institutions noted above, who are looking for market returns on transactions of $25 million and up. So a related vehicle called Aligned Partnerships was created to mobilize smaller investors for infrastructure investments that fall below the $25 million+ threshold.

In addition, the organization recently started building out a strategy to de-risk climate infrastructure investments in emerging markets by blending institutional capital seeking market returns with concessionary capital seeking specific social, development, and/or economic goals. And it is actively considering additional offerings to meet growing demand. In other words, the organization is evolving into a much-needed hub for climate infrastructure capital and, with a little luck, will begin to transition into a financially self-sustaining one in 2018.

As governments become less willing to bankroll transformative change, innovative funding mechanisms will be a critical component of our efforts to address climate change. Bringing foundations and institutional investors together to fast-track investments in climate infrastructure that also generate significant returns is one way to do that. If you're a foundation or institutional investor and would like to learn more about how you can participate, we’d love to hear from you.

Headshot_tracey_durningTracey Durning is the executive director of the Planet Heritage Foundation.

The Long Haul: Lessons From Charitable Responses to Previous Disasters

September 06, 2017

Disaster_response2-800x500While media outlets — both online and print — have been quick to offer suggestions as to how individuals should channel their charitable impulses to help those affected by Hurricane Harvey, many Americans have been inspired by the stirring images of neighbors and strangers lending a hand to help each other.

Alexis de Tocqueville, the Frenchman who documented our voluntary impulse during a tour of a young America in the 1830s, would nod knowingly if he were around to see the extraordinary outpouring of generosity we have witnessed since the first days of flooding in Texas.

Time and again over the last twenty years , I've watched Americans respond quickly and generously to a series of natural and man-made disasters. Corporations and foundations also have risen to the occasion, and the lessons they've learned from their responses are of considerable value as we all weigh how to use our resources to the greatest effect in the wake of a disaster like Harvey.

But I've also learned a few things of my own from the responses to disasters like Katrina and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and would like to share them with you.

First, businesses, foundations, civic and fraternal associations, faith communities, and the public at large must be prepared to invest in both relief and rebuilding efforts. Relief from the immediate suffering and dislocation caused by an unprecedented rain event like Harvey is, rightfully, the first order of business, and Texans know that the road ahead will be long and winding. But the rest of us must be willing to hang in with them for the long haul. As Texas governor Greg Abbott said earlier this week, "Digging out of this catastrophe is going to be a multiyear project for Texas."

After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita devastated the Gulf Coast in the summer of 2005, Nancy Anthony, executive director of the Oklahoma City Community Foundation, recounted how her community was still responding to the mental health needs of first responders and survivors of the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City ten years earlier.

Because they're seen as entities with significant resources, corporations are always under pressure to "get the money out the door" after a disaster occurs. But many companies have discovered that a pledge or commitment with a dollar amount attached to it can be announced immediately while the actual funds are distributed for different phases of the recovery and rebuilding process over time. In fact, that was the course of action taken by the Toshiba Corporation after Hurricane Katrina.

It was also heartening to see the pledge of $36 million made by the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation — the largest to date for Harvey relief and recovery efforts. In announcing the gift, Michael Dell noted that "[i]t will take all of us together, over the long term, to rebuild our Texas communities." Interestingly, the foundation has chosen to pool its resources with others by seeding the Rebuild Texas Fund under the aegis of a charitable intermediary, the OneStar Foundation. The approach is consistent with the one taken after 9/11 by the New York Community Trust and the United Way of New York City, when they joined forces to create the September 11 Fund with the aim of both maximizing the impact of their own resources and creating a vehicle for thousands of others eager to contribute to recovery efforts.

Second, given the scale of the destruction caused by Harvey and regardless of the truly impressive scope of the charitable response, charity cannot presume to be a substitute for action by government at the local, state, and federal levels. It is estimated, for example, that rebuilding the flood-ravaged parts of Texas and Louisiana will far exceed the $50 billion in funds allocated by the Congress to states in the Northeast after Superstorm Sandy in 2012 — and that figure is likely to increase as the full scope of the devastation becomes apparent.

Third, while the dollar amounts attached to relief, recovery, and rebuilding efforts in Texas truly are staggering, small acts of kindness should not be discounted. The images of Houstonians helping neighbors through flooded streets will stick in people’s minds for decades. Something similar happened after the Indian Ocean tsunami created devastation from Thailand to Kenya in December 2004 and many tourists were stranded without access to telephones or other means of communication. However, American Express was able to track many survivors through their credit card charges and notified their loved ones back home, bringing unimaginable relief to countless families.

Fourth, national organizations like the American Red Cross are vital frontline responders. But the hard work of recovery and rebuilding inevitably falls on the shoulders of community-based organizations that are most attuned to local residents' needs. While most such organization are unknown to the general public and almost always are underresourced, they are in the best position to make a small contribution go a long way. In fact, after the Loma Prieta/Bay Area earthquake on October 17, 1989, the only large kitchen in the area in good operating shape belonged to Project Open Hand, the local Meals-on-Wheels organization for homebound people living with AIDS. Over the next few days, its staff and volunteers were able to get meals to many of the 12,000-plus residents of San Francisco's Marina district who had lost their homes.

Fifth, rebuilding efforts at their best must address underlying factors that contribute to a disaster's destructive impact, whatever they may be. While New Orleans cannot hope to avoid hurricanes in the future, the strengthening of the city's levees after Katrina should help to mitigate the damage and dislocation caused by future storms. Such efforts require stakeholders to raise their voices and make the case to government at all levels for the funding of preventive measures.

And finally, government, businesses, foundations, and the public must act to ensure that the lessons learned from previous disasters — and the stories of those who lost their lives or were profoundly affected — are not forgotten. In the fourth decade of the AIDS epidemic in the U.S., a number of local foundations were sufficiently moved to erect a memorial in a park in Greenwich Village to the 100,000-plus New Yorkers who have died from AIDS, while memorials and museums like those in Oklahoma City and on the site of the destroyed World Trade Center serve as much-needed reminders of those tragedies for future generations.

Recovery, rebuilding, and healing after a disaster know no timetable. However, small and big acts can ease the suffering of the survivors and help build stronger and more resilient communities. We just have to pay attention to the lessons learned by those who have already been through it.

Headshot_michael seltzerMichael Seltzer directs the New York Community Trust Leadership Fellows program at Baruch College's Marxe School of Public and International Affairs in New York City. A version of this post appears on the Philanthropy New York site.

Weekend Link Roundup (September 2-3, 2017)

September 04, 2017

Our weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

RosieClimate Change

Did climate change magnify the destructive power of Hurricane Harvey? Robinson Meyer The Atlantic's Robinson Meyer uncovers a fair amount of evidence which suggests that global warming is making a bad situation worse.

On the Yes! Magazine site, 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben talks with Jacqueline Patterson, director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program about the threat of climate change as a lens to understand many of the injustices confronting the planet.

Collaboration

Which of the following elements of effective collaboration is the most challenging: reaching consensus, bringing diverse perspectives to the table, taking meaningful action? Hop over to the Kauffman Foundation site and cast your vote, then read on to learn how "to apply the principles that matter to move to [a] place where collaboration can happen on a much larger scale." 

Data

Could data science be the key to unlocking the next wave of social change? Elizabeth Good Christopherson, president and chief executive officer of the Rita Allen Foundation, talks with Jake Porway, founder of DataKind, a global network of volunteers skilled in data analysis, coding and visualization, about changes in technology that are influencing the work of his organization and the prospects for accelerated social change.

Disaster Relief

The New York Times has a good roundup of federal assistance for those affected by Hurricane Harvey.

Looking for commonsense advice about the best way to donate to Hurricane Harvey relief and recovery efforts? This article by Pam Fessler on the NPR site is a good place to start.

In a post on Slate, Jonathan M. Katz explains why the Red Cross, the default disaster relief recipient for a majority of corporations and individual Americans, won't "save" Houston.

And in a post on the NCRP site, Ginny Goldman, founder and former director of the Texas Organizing Project, the Houston-based affiliate of the Center for Popular Democracy, reminds Americans that "[w]hen camera crews head home and it's time to rebuild Houston, the people on the ground will need organizing capacity and legal support to fight for themselves." 

International Affairs/Development

According to a Better Business Better World report, the UN's Sustainable Development Goals could open up an estimated $12 trillion in market opportunities in four economic systems: food and agriculture, cities, energy and materials, and health and well-being. But, writes Nazila Vali, seizing such opportunities will require many more and much stronger partnerships.

Speaking to a small crowd at the Overseas Development Institute in London, Rajiv Shah, the new head of the Rockefeller Foundation, shared the following math: If the top fifteen foundations in the United States pooled their annual giving, their collective contributions would not fill the gap left by President Trump's proposed 30 percent cuts to foreign assistance. Devex's Molly Anders reports on what Shah is doing to position his foundation for the realities of an "America First" world.

Nonprofits

What can a nonprofit board do to make sure its members are evaluated honestly for their effectiveness? In a post on his Nonprofit Management blog, Eugene Fram shares some good advice.

Philanthropy

Prompted by the recent events in Charlottesville, Nellie Mae Education Foundation president and CEO Nick Donohue argues that maybe philanthropy has become to comfortable in its response to, and efforts to combat, white privilege.

And in her monthly commentary, Kiran Ahuja, CEO of Philanthropy NW, echoes that sentiment.

On the Glasspockets blog, Nicole Richards, chief storyteller at Philanthropy Australia, the national industry association for giving Down Under, argues that when it comes to storytelling, philanthropy generally gets a failing grade. 

And the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy has launched a new blog, and it looks like it's going to be a good one. Content coordinator Abby Rolland explains what she and her colleagues hope to accomplish.

That's it for this week. Got something you'd like to share? Drop us a line at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

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