167 posts categorized "Disaster Relief"

Weekend Link Roundup (October 13-14, 2018)

October 14, 2018

105499618-4ED5-BL-HurricaneMichaelV2-101018.600x337A weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Climate Change

As the global climate continues to warm, there's a "material difference" between 1.5 degrees C of warming and 2 C degrees. Kelly Levin, a senior associate with the World Resources Institute's global climate program, looks at some of them. And Adele Peters, a staff writer at Fast Company, suggests that holding warming to the former, while difficult, might not be impossible.

According to a poll conducted by researchers from Yale, George Mason University, and Climate Nexus, a majority of voters in North Carolina post-Hurricane Florence are worried about climate change (60 percent) and think it's appropriate to talk about the issue when disaster strikes (55 percent). HuffPost's Jeremy Deaton reports.  

Disaster Relief

Hurricane Michael, one of the most powerful storms ever to strike the continental U.S., hammered the Florida Panhandle before carving a path of destruction across Georgia and North Carolina. We're tracking institutional pledges and commitments to relief and recovery efforts here. And Fast Company has put together a list of fifteen things you can do to help the storm's victims.

Education

On her Answer Sheet blog, Kevin Welner, a co-director of the Schools of Opportunity project and director of the National Education Policy Center at the University of Colorado, and Linda Molner Kelley, a co-director of Schools of Opportunity and director for outreach and engagement at the University of Colorado, look at how William C. Hinckley High School in Aurora, Colorado, used a restorative justice approach to change its culture.

Giving

As we head into the holiday season, families and friends should think about allocating some of the money they planned to spend on gifts to a commonly determined cause, writes philanthropy consultant Bill DeBoskey. "Imagine the result," adds DeBoskey, "if each of us pledged to donate to a worthy cause just 10 percent of what we would otherwise spend on holiday gifts, food and candy."

Impact Investing

Forbes contributor Aislinn Murphy has a good Q&A witf LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman, who reveals that he has put $1.5 billion of his considerable fortune into impact investments.

Nonprofits

Nonprofit AF's Vu Le is another leader in the social sector for whom the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was a kind of come-to-Jesus moment.

Over at Forbes, the site's panel of nonprofit experts weighs in on the things that the best nonprofit blogs have in common. 

Is your organization one of the best nonprofits to work for. If the answer is yes, the NonProfit Times would like to hear from you.

Giving Tuesday is just around the corner, and Beth Kanter and Allison Fine have collected fifteen #GivingTuesday myths nonprofits should be aware of.

Philanthropy

On the Center for Effective Philanthropy blog, CEP president Phil Buchanan applauds the announcement of Kathleen Enright, longtime CEO of Grantmakers for Effective Organizations, as the new president and CEO of the Council on Foundations. But in a philanthropic infrastructure landscape that has "changed dramatically" since the early days of GEO and CEP, what role should the council play? asks Buchanan. Check out his post to learn what he thinks that role should be.

And in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Alison Corwin, senior program officer for sustainable environments at the Surdna Foundation, argues that when it  comes to building the capacity of frontline and grassroots leaders, funders first need to "build [their] own individual and institutional skills to receive and incorporate the insight these leaders and communities provide."

That's it for this week. Got something you'd like to share? Drop us a note at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

Tracking Hurricane Michael Disaster Relief

October 12, 2018

Updated: October 17, 2018 - 4:45 PM ET

Hurricane Michael first showed up in early October as a low-pressure area in the western Caribbean. After meandering for a few days, it began to organize itself and then intensified rapidly as it moved past Cuba into the Gulf of Mexico, becoming a tropical depression on October 7 and a Category 1 hurricane just twenty-four hours later. By Tuesday, October 9, it had strengthened into a Cat 3 with winds of more than 120 mph, and by the time it smashed into the Florida Panhandle near Mexico Beach on Wednesday, October 10, it was a Cat 4 with sustained winds of 155 mph.

For many, the unprecedented nature of the storm — the most intense tropical cyclone to strike the U.S. since Andrew in 1992, the third most intense storm in terms of barometric pressure ever to make landfall in the U.S., and the strongest hurricane to strike the Florida Panhandle on record — was disturbing, its rapid intensification and the path of destruction it carved across four states cause for alarm, coming as it did just days after the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report warning of dire consequences if greenhouse gas emissions are not cut dramatically over the next decade. As of Wednesday afternoon, a week after the storm made landfall, the death toll had risen to thirty-two, including fifteen in Florida, and estimates of the damage were holding steady at between $8 billion and $30 billion.

As we did with Florence, Foundation Center will be tracking institutional pledges and commitments for relief and recovery efforts here on PhilanTopic. To make sure your company or organization's pledge have been included in the total, or for questions about methodology or sources, please contact Andrew Grabois, manager of corporate philanthropy at Foundation Center.

Mexico Beach destruction

(Photo credit: Reuters)

TOTAL: $20,910,000

Organization Type (pledges and commitments)

Corporate Direct Giving/
Company-Sponsored Foundations
$17,710,000 29 orgs.
Private Foundations $0 0 orgs.
Public Charities $3,200,000 5 orgs.

Top Recipients (Total Received to Date)

1. Unknown Recipient(s) $12,550,000
2. American Red Cross
(national)
$4,755,000
3. Florida Disaster Fund $1,600,000
4. Multiple Recipients $1,100,000
5. United Way Worldwide $375,000
6. Samaritan's Purse $250,000
7. Volunteer Florida $250,000
8. American Red Cross, North Florida Region $50,000

Source: Foundation Center & Center for Disaster Philanthropy

Download the Data

For the latest coverage of the philanthropic sector's response to
Hurricane Florence, check out Philanthropy News Digest.

Weekend Link Roundup (September 29-30, 2018)

September 30, 2018

KavanaughAndBlaseyFordA weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Corporate Social Responsibility

As we've seen after other natural disasters recently, U.S. corporations and companies are stepping up to help the folks in the Carolinas who've been affected by flooding caused by Hurricane Florence. On a related note, Business Insider's Chelsea Greenwood has compiled a list of the ten companies that gave the most to charity in 2017.

The Forbes Business Development Council shares some good advice for small business looking to be charitable. 

Economy

Sso-called gig work promises a measure of flexiblity and independence that traditional jobs don't. But the pay is lousy, and people are starting to figure that out. A new report from the JPMorgan Chase Institute offers three sobering conclusions about the gig economy. Christopher Rugaber reports for the AP.

Health

How can we reverse the obesity epidemic? Washington Post contributor Tamar Haspel shares six commonsense suggestions.

International Affairs/Development

The world has made excellent progress in reducing poverty over the last twenty-five years, write Bill and Melinda Gates in an opinion piece for the New York Times. But thanks to "the unfortunate intersection of two demographic trends," that progress could stall, or even be reversed, if appropriate action is not taken.

Nonprofits

In Forbes, Ben Paynter shares findings from a new report issued by Fidelity Charitable which suggest that nonprofits should be doing more to court entrepreneurs as donors.

On the Guidestar blog, Becca Bennett and Jordan Ritchie offer some guidelines designed to help nonprofits get the most from their boards.

It's a crazy world we live in, and sometimes the best way to respond to it is to give ourselves a break. Social Velocity's Nell Edgington explains why it's important and what you can do to defeat that voice in your head which keeps whispering, "Don't even think about."

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Weekend Link Roundup (September 22-23, 2018)

September 23, 2018

Grassley_feinsteinA weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Communications/Marketing

"Anyone with a desire to manipulate opinions...knows that our digital dependencies make it easier than ever to do so through supposedly trustworthy institutions," writes Lucy Bernholz on her Philanthropy 2173 blog. What does that mean for nonprofits? "If your communications strategy still assumes that 'hey, they'll trust us — we're a nonprofit' or 'hey, this is what the data say,' " then it's time for your organization to "reconsider both what you say, how you say it, how you protect what you say, and your expectations and responses to how what you say gets heard and gets used."

Democracy/Public Affairs

In a new post on its website, the Community Foundation Boulder County looks at the work of Common Cause to ensure an accurate, representative census count in 2020.

On the Glasspockets blog, Janet Camarena, director of transparency initiatives at Foundation Center, chats with Jennifer Humke, senior program officer for journalism and media at the John D. and Catherine T.  MacArthur Foundation, about how foundation support for participatory media can strengthen American democracy.

Disaster Relief

Roughly 70 percent of the money and resources donated after a disaster like Herricane Florence goes to immediate response efforts, but recovery from such a disaster requires long-term investment. (Just as the folks in Puerto Rico.) Is there a better way to do disaster relief? asks Eillie Anzilotti in Fast Company. And while you're at it, check out our Hurricane Florence dashboard, which is tracking the private institutional response to the storm.

International Affairs/Development

The latest edition of the Commitment to Development Index, which ranks twenty-seven of the world's richest countries by how well their policies help improve lives in the developing world, has Sweden edging out Denmark (which led the index last year) as the top performer. The Center for Global Development has the details

In his latest, Nonprofit Chronicles blogger Marc Gunther piggybacks on ongoing assessments of a Catholic Relief Services direct-cash-transfer program in Rwanda to remind people that scale does not always equal impact.

In advance of this year's meeting of the UN General Assembly, the Rockefeller Foundation is asking folks to weigh in on what they think is the most solvable of the Sustainable Development Goals. 

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A Conversation With Dee Baecher-Brown, President, Community Foundation of the Virgin Islands

September 18, 2018

Scenes of catastrophic flooding caused by Hurricane Florence are a painful reminder of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, one of the deadliest and most destructive on record. After an earlier-than-usual start, the season took a turn for the worst in August when Harvey became the first major hurricane since 2005 to make landfall in the U.S., submerging large swaths of the Houston metro area and southeastern Texas. Then, in September, Irma became the first Category 5 hurricane to impact the northern Leeward Islands, including the U.S. Virgin Islands and Barbuda, which was flattened, before making landfall in the Florida keys with sustained winds of 130 mph. A few weeks later, Maria became the first Category 5 hurricane on record to strike the island of Dominica, causing catastrophic damage there, before striking Puerto Rico and leaving that U.S. territory a shambles.

Recently, PND spoke with Dee Baecher-Brown, president of the Community Foundation of the Virgin Islands, about the progress made in the year since Irma and Maria pummeled the islands and what donors in a disaster situation can do to balance the urgency of immediate needs with longer-term recovery goals and objectives. A full accounting of the donors who stepped up to help the Virgin Islands in the wake of the hurricanes will be included in CFVI's year-end report.

Headshot_dee_beacher-brownPhilanthropy News Digest: It's been a year since Hurricanes Irma and Maria pummeled the Virgin Islands. Now we’re watching as Florence, another powerful Atlantic hurricane, brings catastrophic flooding to the Carolinas. What are your thoughts as you watch footage of the destruction and displacement caused by Florence?

Dee Baecher-Brown: My first thought is concern. Many of our friends and family are in harm's way, and we're hoping for the best. We don't want anyone to have to experience what the Virgin Islands experienced with Irma and Maria. As the extent of the damage caused by the storm becomes clearer, we just want the folks in the Carolinas to know that we are there for them, because we know firsthand what a difference the outpouring of concern and support in the days immediately following those storms meant to us.

PND: Take us back to weeks just before Irma and Maria hit the Virgin Islands. Was your community as prepared as it could have been?

DBB: You know, that's something we've discussed many times over the course of the last twelve months. Obviously, two category 5 storms in a two-week period was unprecedented, and even though we got a little tired of that word, it does capture something people sometimes forget — namely, that it's hard to prepare for something that hasn't happened before. And the fact that we are small, fairly remote islands in the Caribbean didn't help matters.

That said, I felt CFVI was as prepared as we could have been. We had spent the last twenty-five years supporting the thoughtful, gradual growth of our community, and in terms of our own capacity we had arrived at a point where we had solid financial systems in place and were working with an amazing network of community organizations — organizations that, in my opinion, were key to our being able to help after the storms hit. In September, for example, just days after Maria hit, we were already making grants to our partners, and we were able to do that because we knew who was out there, we knew the kind of work they would be doing, and we knew they needed our support. So, yes, I felt we were as ready as we could be for something that had never happened before.

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Tracking Hurricane Florence Disaster Relief

September 15, 2018

Updated: October 12, 2018 - 4:30 PM ET

After churning across the mid-Atlantic as a major Category 3/4 hurricane, Florence weakened as it neared the U.S. mainland, finally making landfall early Friday morning as a Cat 1, with sustained winds of 100 mph, near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. With a storm surge of more then ten feet reported in some areas of the state, the still-powerful, slow-moving storm was expected to drop biblical amounts of rain and cause extensive flooding across the Carolinas over the weekend. As of Saturday afternoon, Bloomberg was reporting that the storm had already dropped two feet of rain across southeastern North Carolina, "submerging cities...and threatening the large and environmentally precarious hog industry," while knocking out power for hundreds of thousands of people in both North and South Carolina. As of Saturday, the death toll from the storm had risen to forty-three.

Foundation Center and the Center for Disaster Philanthropy will be tracking the private institutional response to Florence over the coming days and will post updated totals, dashboard style, here on PhilanTopic. To make sure your company or organization's pledge has been included in the total, or for questions about methodology or sources, please contact Andrew Grabois, manager of corporate philanthropy at Foundation Center.

Florence-from-space

(Photo credit: Reuters)

TOTAL: $53,657,000

Organization Type (pledges and commitments)

Corporate Direct Giving/
Company-Sponsored Foundations
$41,101,000 76 orgs.
Private Foundations $5,250,000 4 orgs.
Public Charities $5,306,000 8 orgs.

Top Recipients (Total Received to Date)

1. Unknown Recipient(s) $15,976,000
2. American Red Cross (national) $10,640,000
3. Hurricane Florence Response Fund
(Foundation for the Carolinas)
$5,100,000
4. WE Care Fund
(Wells Fargo employee assistance fund)
$3,000,000
5. Delivering Good $3,000,000
6. North Carolina Community Foundation Disaster Relief Fund $1,425,000
7. Feeding the Carolinas $1,000,000
8. Good360 $1,000,000
9. United Way Hurricane Florence Recovery Fund $625,000
10. Salvation Army $600,000

Source: Foundation Center & Center for Disaster Philanthropy

Download the Data

For the latest coverage of the philanthropic sector's response to
Hurricane Florence, check out Philanthropy News Digest.

An Update From the Community Foundation of the Virgin Islands

September 08, 2018

Irma_USVI_940x627After a quiet start, the 2018 hurricane season is heating up, with Florence drawing a bead on the Carolinas and two other systems farther out in the Atlantic gaining strength. A year after Hurricanes Irma and Maria brought devastation to the Caribbean, it seems like a good time to ask (again): What kind of role should philanthropy play in post-disaster recovery?

Dee Baecher-Brown and George H.T. Dudley, president and chair, respectively, of the Community Foundation of the Virgin Islands, have been thinking about that question. In an update (below) to donors and the USVI community, Baecher-Brown and Dudley share highlights of the foundation's post-disaster grantmaking and announce the launch of a new fund aimed at sustaining that progress into the future.

________

To our fellow Virgin Islanders, and all who hold our islands in their hearts:

Waking up on September 6, 2018, greeted by sun, a slight breeze, and surrounded by beautiful blue waters, we were mindful that just a year ago Hurricanes Irma and then Maria were about to make landfall in the Virgin Islands, ravaging our homes, displacing our families, and destroying our businesses in two of the costliest, most destructive hurricanes in American history. In hours, the winds of destruction wiped away what so many had spent their entire lives building.

The Community Foundation of the Virgin Islands (CFVI) knows firsthand just how significant a challenge we all faced then and continue to face today. In the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Maria, CFVI established a number of special funds to support both immediate and long-term relief and jump-start community renewal efforts. The Fund for the Virgin Islands was created the day after Hurricane Irma to respond to donors' asking "How can we help?" Before Hurricane Maria made landfall, the CFVI board of directors had already established the Friends and Families Fund for USVI Renewal. More than fifteen additional funds and fiscal sponsorships have since been established by generous donors to CFVI for the purpose of helping the Virgin Islands and Virgin Islanders to recover.

Over the past year, more than 10,000 individual donors and institutions provided over $15 million in donations and grants. People who wanted to make a difference but didn't know how or where to start were able to pool their resources with like-minded stakeholders and target help where it was most needed.

Continue reading »

Weekend Link Roundup (December 2-3, 2017)

December 03, 2017

Local-food-and-wine-roasted-chestnutsOur weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Aging

According to Claire Petersky, executive director of the Wallingford Community Senior Center in Seattle, "Only 4 percent of us end up in nursing homes, and that number is dropping. Dementia? The vast majority of us, 90 percent, have our marbles when we die, and the numbers who die with dementia is also dropping. Depression? Turns out, we are happiest at the beginnings and ends of our lives. It's called the U Curve of Happiness." Petersky's colleague, Nonprofit AF blogger Vu Le, explains why we all need to change the way we think about older adults.

Climate Change

The California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS), the largest public pension fund, in the U.S., has announced an equity investment in two large wind farms, the Caney River facility in Elk County, Kansas, and the Rocky Ridge facility in Kiowa and Washita counties, Oklahoma.

An NPR analysis of grants awarded by the National Science Foundation found a steady decline in the number with the phrase "climate change" in the title or summary — a change in language that "appears to be driven in part by the Trump administration's open hostility to the topic of climate change." Rebecca Hersher reports for NPR.

Disaster Relief

Mother Jones editor Kanyakrit Vongkiatkajorn shares some good advice for those who want to help in the wake of a natural disaster.

Giving

If you haven't heard, this year's #GivingTuesday campaign (the sixth annual) was a huge success, raising more than $274 million for nonprofits working in the U.S. and around the world. Congrats to all who gave and participated!

Felix Salmon, host and editor of the Cause & Effect blog, had charitable giving on his mind this week, posting a piece on Tuesday about why it's okay if the charitable sector shrinks a little as a result of the Republican tax bills working their way through Congress ("[A] a lot of very rich people are going to see their taxes cut, and at the margin, the less you pay in taxes, the less incentive you have to try to avoid them through mechanisms like charitable giving") and following that up with a piece on Thursday that addresses the question: How do you get people to donate less money to less-effective charities, and more money to more-effective charities.

According to Network for Good, 29 percent of all online giving happens in December and 11 percent happens in the last three days of the month. Which is why you'll want to spend a few minutes with these "essential" fundraising resources compiled by Brady Josephson.

It's not exactly news anymore, but Tennessean.com business columnist Jennifer Pagliara has some good advice for those who are looking to reach out to to today’s digitally savvy contributors — millennial or otherwise.

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Building a Better World Through Design: Protothon and EY

November 29, 2017

Keep calm and get hackingRecently, more than eighty design-oriented and engineering students from ten different universities as well as professionals from across New York City spent fifteen hours over two days at the NYU Media and Gaming Network (MAGNET) facilities in Brooklyn for the first-ever "Prototyping Hackathon" (ProtothonTM). Sponsored by Ernst & Young LLP (EY), the theme of the inaugural Protothon was disaster relief.

In the U.S. alone, the first nine months of 2017 brought fifteen disasters claiming a total of 323 American lives and costing $1 billion or more each. These figures do not include the devastation Mexico suffered from a recent earthquake and the extensive damage storms have inflicted across Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. In the aftermath of major disasters like the ones we saw in 2017, nonprofit organizations, companies, and individuals are eager to extend a helping hand, either by donating money in support of relief and recovery efforts or by applying their core competencies to the situation in innovative ways.  

"Design can save lives," said Domenick Propati, founder of Protothon and an NYU professor. "This Protothon will showcase that premise as teams develop impactful and actionable solutions that can be carried forward to help those impacted by natural disasters."

Participating students sat in on a panel with three people who have worked in different aspects of disaster relief and recovery efforts, attended a UX design workshop, and then broke into teams and spent ten intense hours working to develop innovative and sustainable solutions that addressed one of the many disaster-related challenges voiced by the panel. While the final presentations featured prototypes of the solutions, they all had seen numerous iterations and improvements throughout the day — with feedback from experts in design, disaster relief, and solutions development.

Continue reading »

Weekend Link Roundup (November 18-19, 2017)

November 19, 2017

Say no to sexual harassmentOur weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Communications/Marketing

"In a world where there is 'an avalanche of crazy things coming out of the [current] administration', communications professionals find themselves having to rethink how they communicate both internally and externally," writes Jason Tomassini, associate director for editorial at Atlantic Media Strategies, on the Communications Network site. At the recent ComNet17 conference, Tomassini and the network invited attendees to participate in a discussion about how they're navigating communications challenges in the current political environment. Here are four key takeaways from that discussion.

Disaster Relief

The Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund, the fund created by Houston mayor Sylvester Turner and Harris County judge Ed Emmett, has announced a second round of grants totaling $28.9 million to nintey nonprofits. The Houston Chronicle's Mike Morris has the details.

Giving

Although the giving traditions of the Rockefeller family were established almost a hundred and fifty years ago, writes Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisor's Melissa Blackerby, modern philanthropists can still learn from the family's values and example.

Gun Violence

In the HuffPost, Melissa Jeltsen and Sarah Ruiz-Grossman use data collected by Everytown for Gun Safety to argue that most mass shootings in America are related to domestic violence.

Higher Education

The dueling Republican tax bills working their way through Congress have implications for exempt sectors of the economy that could fundamentally change the way they operate. In this Weekend Edition segment, NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks to Raynard Kington, president of Grinnell College, a small liberal arts college in Iowa with a large endowment, about the Republican proposal to levy an excise tax on endowment income.

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Weekend Link Roundup (October 28-29, 2017)

October 29, 2017

Tax_2Our weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Civic Tech

On the Getting Smart blog, Tom Vander Ark, former director of education at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and author of Getting Smart: How Personal Digital Learning is Changing the World, highlights ten tech-driven developments (widespread unemployment, widening inequality, algorithmic bias, machine ethics, genome editing) that require decisions, sooner rather than later, we are not prepared to make.

In a new post on her Philanthropy 2173 blog, Lucy Bernholz wonders whether the social sector can "pre-emptively develop a set of guardrails for the application of new technologies so that predictable harm (at least) can be minimized or prevented?" 

Disaster Relief/Recovery

In Houston, the newly formed Greater Houston Flood Mitigation Consortium is convening leading  researchers to compile, analyze, and share an array of scientifically-informed data about flooding risk and mitigation opportunities in the region. Three key stakeholders in the effort — Ann Stern, president and CEO of the Houston Endowment; Nancy Kinder, president of the Kinder Foundation; and Katherine Lorenz, president of the Cynthia & George Mitchell Foundation — explain what the initiative hopes to accomplish.

Education

"It is the latest iteration for a philanthropy that has both had a significant influence on K-12 policy over its two-decades-long involvement in the sector — and drawn harsh criticism for pushing ideas that some see as technocratic." Education Week's Stephen Sawchuck examines what the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s recent strategy pivot and new investments in K-12 education signal for the field.

Giving

Donald Trump and his administration's policies appear to be behind a dramatic increase in giving to progress groups. Ben Paynter reports for Fast Company.

Forbes has published its annual list of the top givers in the U.S.

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5 Questions for...Mark Brewer, President and CEO, Central Florida Foundation

October 19, 2017

In September, with the Houston area still wringing itself out after the historic rains dropped by Hurricane Harvey two weeks earlier, parts of the Caribbean and Florida suffered their own disaster, as Hurricane Irma became the first Category 5 storm on record to hit the Leeward Islands and then moved over much of Florida as a Category 3 storm, causing millions of Floridians to evacuate and leaving the Florida Keys cut off from the mainland.

Recently, PND spoke with Mark Brewer, president and CEO of the Orlando-based Central Florida Foundation, about the relief and recovery efforts in his region and what the foundation is doing to help nonprofits in the area get back to normal.

Philanthropy News Digest: What is the extent of the damage in the region served by CFF?

Mark_Brewer_Central Florida FoundationMark Brewer: Finding the answer to that question has been an evolving process. As I'm sure you know, there are three phases to these events: response, recovery, and rebuilding. In some parts of the region we're still in response mode, in part because of the widespread electrical outages and water-related issues in the counties on the coast. But response and recovery is going to look different here than it does in South Florida and the Caribbean, even though we suffered a large amount of unseen damage.

This morning [September 25], for example, more than a hundred daycare centers didn't open because they suffered damage to their buildings or their employees couldn't get into work. That translates into thousands of people who couldn’t get to work because they didn't have child care. So when you look out at the roads, things look like they're clearing up, the tree branches are being removed. But when you start looking at nonprofits in the region, you see that they're struggling to get back to full strength.

PND: What are the most immediate needs, and how do you think things will unfold over the next several months?

MB: The response phase is wrapping up. Most of the power has been restored, and people are starting to get back into their normal routines. Recovery is about getting back to business as usual. It's not just those daycare centers, it's also about making certain that everyone who cares for people with disabilities, children, and the elderly are back in business and the overall "quality-of-life-system" in the region operates as it’s supposed to. For the rest of 2017, we're going to be moving into recovery and making certain that service providers are operational and have what they need. Then for most of 2018, I think it will be a mix of recovery and rebuilding as it becomes clearer who was able to recover from the storm and who wasn't. Remember, while we're happy to have FEMA on the ground, it can sometimes take months  even years  for FEMA to pay the bills. That means you will see a lot of nonprofits that are stressed in terms of their capacity to help people with things that they've been told they'll be reimbursed for later.

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Weekend Link Roundup (October 7-8, 2017)

October 08, 2017

Tom-pettyOur weekly roundup of noteworthy items from and about the social sector. For more links to great content, follow us on Twitter at @pndblog....

Disaster Relief

ProPublica, no fan of the Red Cross, sent a team of reporters to Texas to see how the organization performed in the days after Hurricane Harvey swamped Houston and the surrounding region. They found a lot of local officials who were not impressed. And here's the official Red Cross response to the criticism.

Giving

In the Baltimore Sun, Aaron Dorfman, president of the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy, wonders whether elimination of the estate tax, as the Trump administration has proposed, will result in a decline in charitable giving, especially large gifts. That's what happened the last time the tax was effectively zeroed out, in 2010, a year that saw bequests from estates decline by 37 percent from the previous year ($11.9 billion to $7.49 billion). A year later, after the tax had been reinstated (albeit at a lower level), the dollar value of bequests rose some 92 percent (to $14.36 billion). And in an op-ed in the Argus Leader, Dorfman provides some numbers which suggest that the family farm argument for eliminating the tax is overstated.

Inequality

On the Washington Post's Wonkblog, Tracy Jan shares a set of charts from the Urban Institute that help explain why the wealth gap between white families and everyone else is widenening.

International Affairs/Development

In a welcome development, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, a coalition of disarmament activists, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. Rick Gladstone reports for the New York Times.

Continue reading »

Most Popular PhilanTopic Posts (September 2017)

October 03, 2017

September 2017. A month most of us would like to forget. But while folks in Texas, Louisiana, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were being pounded by Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria, our colleagues here at the Foundation Center were doing yeoman's work tracking the hundreds and millions of dollars (more than $300 million at last count) in corporate, foundation, and individual commitments for relief and recovery efforts. For folks interested interested in doing a deeper dive into who gave what, we posted (and regularly updated) some great tables during the month (see below) — as well as great posts by Michael Seltzer, Surina Khan, Tracey Durning, and Chris Kabel (Kresge Foundation), Amy Kenyon (Ford Foundation), and Sharon Z. Roerty (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation). Check it out...and RIP Tom Petty — our hearts are broken.

What have you read/watched/heard lately that got your attention, made you think, or charged you up? Feel free to share in the comments section below. Or drop us a line at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

Commitments for Hurricane Irma Relief

September 20, 2017

In the nearly two weeks after Hurricane Irma devastated wide swaths of the Caribbean and Florida, corporations, foundations, and public charities have pledged support for relief and recovery efforts. Here are the commitments of at least $25,000 tracked by our Foundation Center colleagues Andrew Grabois and Grace Sato as of September 20.

For commitments designated for both Harvey and Irma relief, please see our updates to the Harvey relief commitments announced by corporate foundations and corporate giving programs, foundations, public charities, and individuals. See also Foundation Center's Measuring the State of Disaster Philanthropy site for Harvey-related grants. We're also posting commitments designated for Hurricane Maria and the Mexico City earthquake.

[We're continuing to update the tables as commitments are announced. Please scroll to the bottom of the post for ongoing updates.]

Table 1: Company-Sponsored Foundations, Corporate Giving Programs

Grantmaker Type Recipient Amount Notes
Abbvie Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 Also employee match
Allergan Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $150,000 $100,000 to American Red Cross for relief efforts in Florida; $50,000 for relief efforts in Caribbean
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program MusiCares $25,000
Amgen Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Direct Relief, American Kidney Fund $100,000 Also employee match
Amway Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match
Anthem Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Americares $75,000 Also employee match
AT&T Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Team Rubicon, Telecoms Sans Frontieres, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,400,000 $1,000,000 to Team Rubicon; $150,000 to Telecoms Sans Frontieres
Bank of America Charitable Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,250,000 $1,000,000 to be allocated when an assessment is completed
BankUnited, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 For impacted areas of Florida
BB&T Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 Includes $250,000 in donated supplies
BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $825,000 $75,000 for employee match
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida
Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000
Charter Communications, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Rebuilding Together $1,350,000 Includes $1,000,000 in donated public service announcements
Charter Communications, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Rebuilding Together $1,350,000 Includes $1,000,000 in donated public service announcements
Chevron Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program DonorsChoose.org $400,000 For local public school classroom projects in south Florida
Chevron Global Fund Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $600,000 Also employee match
Citi Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000
Coach Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Direct Relief $33,000
Coca-Cola Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Immediate relief and long-term rebuilding
CUNA Mutual Group Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation CUAid $50,000 For affected credit union partners and employees
CVS Health Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Florida Disaster Fund, CVS Health Employee Relief Fund $75,000
Duke Energy Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Volunteer Florida Foundation – Florida Disaster Fund, United Way, Energy Neighbor Fund, local community agencies $1,000,000
eBay Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $100,000 For impacted areas of Gulf Coast
Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Multiple Recipients $250,000 Also product donations from company
Enterprise Holdings Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Americares $1,000,000 $750,000 to American Red Cross; $250,000 to Americares
EVERTEC, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program United for Puerto Rico – Together Changing Trajectories, Unknown Recipients $150,000 For relief efforts in Puerto Rico; $50,000 for social media match
FedEx Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and value of transportation support
Fifth Third Bank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $500,000 $250,000 for employee match
Ford Motor Company Fund Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $150,000 Employee match.
Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida and the Caribbean. Also employee match
Google.org Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,250,000 For impacted areas in southeastern United States and Caribbean; $250,000 for employee match
Humana Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee match
IBM Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 Shelter and call center management. Also donations of Cloud and consulting, and technologies for large-scale volunteer management for Government and NGO partners
JPMorgan Chase & Co. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients $1,000,000 For impacted areas in United States and Caribbean
Kohl's Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $1,000,000 Also employee volunteerism
Lowe's Companies, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and in-kind donations. Also customer donations
MAXIMUS Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Volunteer Florida $100,000
McKesson Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Americares $185,000 Value of donated product
Mckesson Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $125,000 Employee match
Merck & Co., Inc. Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund, Multiple Recipients 1,250,000 Also product donations
Microsoft Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $750,000 Also donation of tech services
New York Life Insurance Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Save the Children, Feeding America, UNICEF, NYLIC Family Disaster Assistance Fund $450,000 Also employee match; $100,000 for impacted agents and employees
NextEra Energy Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Florida Disaster Fund $1,000,000 Also employee match
Norfolk Southern Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Feeding Tampa Bay, Feeding South Florida $100,000
Paypal Holdings, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Save the Children $200,000 Also customer donations
PepsiCo Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Feeding America, American Red Cross $1,750,000 For assistance in Florida and the Southeast U.S., Mexico, Caribbean
Prudential Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross $500,000 Also employee match
Royal Bank of Canada Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $300,000 For relief and recovery efforts in Florida and the Caribbean
Scotiabank Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program Canadian Red Cross $500,000 $250,000 for relief and recovery efforts in the Caribbean; young people in affected communities
Sealed Air Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program World Food Program USA, American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity $225,000 $100,000 each for emergency aid for the Caribbean and mainland U.S.; $25,000 for employee match; also product donations
StorageMart Partners, L.P. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program GlobalGiving $25,000 Employee match
SunTrust Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $500,000 $250,000 to American Red Cross
Target Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, Save the Children, UNICEF, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 Cash and in-kind donations
United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $50,000 Customer match
UnitedHealth Group Incorporated Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For impacted Florida communities. Also employee match
UPS Foundation Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $1,000,000 For recovery efforts in the Caribbean, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. Includes cash grants, in-kind transportation movements and technical expertise
Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 Employee match.
Verizon Communications Inc. Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Hand in Hand $2,500,000
VS Health Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $25,000 Value of donated water
Walgreens Corporate Giving Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $200,000 For relief efforts in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. Also donating food and water.
Wal-Mart Foundation, Inc. Company-Sponsored Foundation Unknown Recipient(s) $10,000,000 Customer match
Walt Disney Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program Multiple Recipients 2,500,000 For Florida, the Caribbean, and other impacted areas
Wells Fargo & Company Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,100,000 $500,000 to American Red Cross; $100,000 for relief and recovery efforts in the Caribbean
Xerox Corporation Contributions Program Corporate Giving Program American Red Cross $75,000 $75,000 for employee match
Total: $50,243,000

 

Table 2: Foundations

Charles and Margery Barancik Foundation, Inc. Independent Foundation All Faiths Food Bank, Pines of Sarasota Foundation $374,000 $172,000 for two weeks of food; $202,000 for air conditioning
Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, Inc. Independent Foundation Senior Resources Alliance, Feeding South Florida, Feeding Northeast Florida, Goodman Jewish Family Services of Broward County, Jewish Community Services of South Florida $500,000 For the immediate needs of older adults in areas most affected; for emergency food, water, supplies, and repairs throughout Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade, and Monroe counties; for crisis case management, including counseling and financial assistance to low-income older adults for home repairs and other needs related to the hurricane
Total: $874,000

 

Table 3: Public Charities

American Kidney Fund, Inc. Public Charity Unknown Recipient(s) $120,000 Emergency disaster relief assistance to 500 dialysis patients
Laura Bush Foundation for America's Libraries Public Charity Unknown Recipient $500,000 For rebuilding school libraries that have been damaged during this year's hurricane season
Our Family Foundation, Inc. Public Charity American Red Cross $250,000 For hardest hit areas in Florida
PetSmart Charities, Inc. Public Charity Miami-Dade Animal Services, Atlanta Humane Society, Unknown Recipient(s) $1,115,000 For animal welfare organizations. Also product donations
Total: $1,985,000


September 22, 2017

The CUNA Mutual Group Foundation announces a $50,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The MAXIMUS Foundation, Inc. announces a $100,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

The New York Life Insurance Company Contributions Program announces a $450,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The Norfolk Southern Foundation announces a $100,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $50,194,000


September 25, 2017

The United Air Lines, Inc. Contributions Program announces a $150,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The BBVA Compass Corporate Giving Program announces a $825,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

Updated corporate total: $51,069,000


September 27, 2017

The Coach Foundation, Inc. announces a $33,000 pledge for Irma relief efforts.

The Laura Bush Foundation for America's Libraries announces a $500,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation announces a $500,000 commitment for Irma relief efforts.

Updated total: $52,102,000


September 28, 2017

The Duke Energy Foundation announces a $1 million commitment for Irma relief efforts.

Updated total: $53,102,000


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