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36 posts categorized "Infographics"

Philanthropy's Paradigm Shift

December 13, 2014

The following was sent to us by George McCully, creator of the Massachusetts Catalogue for Philanthropy, which was launched in 1997 as a collaborative project of about twenty leading foundations, corporations, and individual donors in the state and distributed annually through 2007, and the Massachusetts Philanthropic Directory, in 2011.

(Click on chart for larger version)

Paradigm Shift-Final-GMcCully-12-10-14 copy

Lots of ideas, trends, and concepts to chew on here. Which ones do you agree with? Disagree? What would you add? How will this historic shift affect your organization/institution and practice? Share your thoughts below...

Most Popular PhilanTopic Posts (September 2014)

October 02, 2014

The leaves are turning, days are getting shorter, winter's closing in. Still plenty of time, though, to catch up with the most popular posts here on PhilanTopic in September. Have a post you'd like to share with our readers? Drop us a line at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

What have you read/watched/listened to lately that surprised, delighted you, or made you think? Share your finds in the comments section below....

[Infographic] How to Track Your Social Media Data and Measure ROI

September 27, 2014

This week's infographic, courtesy of Infographic World -- with a tip of the hat to Darin McKeever and Beth Kanter -- provides a mini-tutorial on how to track and measure your social media efforts. Lots of really useful information here, from what to track, to posting guidelines, to tools you can use to make sense of all the data you are (or should be) collecting.

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[Infographic] LGBT Rights Around the World

September 13, 2014

If, like us, recent headlines have you feeling more than a little discouraged, the infographic below should cheer you up.  While acknowledging that gays and lesbians around the world have widely different experiences, it notes that the legal status of LGBT individuals in the U.S. has improved markedly in recent years. As regular readers of PND and PhilanTopic know, that's due, in part, to the tireless efforts of foundations such as Gill, Arcus, Ford, Haas, Pride, Horizons, Tides, and van Ameringen. And while acceptance of gays and lesbians is not yet the norm in many regions of the world, recognition of same-sex relationships and/or marriage is becoming more common -- a reminder that social change, while not easy, is possible when enough people see an injustice and commit themselves to righting it.

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[Infographic] The Million-Dollar Philanthropist at a Glance

July 05, 2014

It's a glorious day here in NYC, the kind of day when anything, even a transformative million-dollar gift, seems possible. Certainly, as our coverage here at PND makes abundantly clear, there have been a lot of them made over the last decade or so. But as this infographic from the folks at the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at IUPUI shows, the vast majority of individuals who give at this level give only once. Food for thought as you head off to your next holiday weekend cookout....

Inforgraphic_million_dollar philanthropist

[Infographic] AIDS Today: The Facts, Figures, and Trajectory of a Global Illness

May 03, 2014

By October 2, 1985, the morning Rock Hudson died, the word was familiar to almost every household in the Western world.
     AIDS.
     Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome had seemed a comfortably distant threat to most of those who had heard of it before, the misfortune of people who fit into rather distinct classes of outcasts and social pariahs. But suddenly, in the summer of 1985, when a movie star was diagnosed with the disease and the newspapers couldn't stop talking about it, the AIDS epidemic became palpable and the threat loomed everywhere....

So begins And the Band Played On: Politics, People and the AIDS Epidemic, Randy Shilts' masterful 1987 account of the epidemic's early days -- and the federal government's feckless response to the unfolding crisis.

Much changed in the decades that followed the publication of Shilts' book. The virus spread to every corner of the globe. Scientists and researchers, backed by foundations like the Aaron Diamond Foundation and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, raced to find a vaccine. Governments woke up to the threat. And, with the advent of anti-retroviral therapy, infection rates finally began to slow and then stabilize.

Today, as the infographic below illustrates, the news on the HIV/AIDS front is mostly positive. Indeed, over the last ten years, the global community, working together, has managed to reduce the risk of HIV/AIDS by more than 50 percent for fully one-third of the people on the planet:

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Most Popular PhilanTopic Posts (April 2014)

May 01, 2014

Infographics, a book review, and good advice for nonprofit communications pros and individuals thinking about starting their own nonprofit organization -- like the weather, April here at PhilanTopic was all about variety. It was also a big month for vacations, so here's another chance to catch up on some of the things you may have missed....

What have you read/watched/listened to over the last month that made you think, surprised you, or caused you to scratch your head? Share your finds in the comments section below....

[Infographic] 'Nonprofits Online: The 2014 M+R Benchmarks Study'

April 10, 2014

M+R, a D.C.-based consulting firm, in partnership with NTEN, have released the 2014 M+R Benchmarks Study. Now in its eighth year, the study of fifty-three of the country's leading nonprofits found that even though response rates for nonprofit email solicitations continued to slide in 2013, online giving was up and social media audiences and Web site traffic continued to climb.

The Benchmarks Study always offers an interesting snapshot of the sector, and judging from the infographic below, this year's edition is no exception:

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[Infographic] Charitable Giving in the U.S. vs the UK

April 05, 2014

"The UK should not aspire to a U.S. model of philanthropy and tax incentives -- it is not replicable and is a unique product of social, political and historical factors," a report released by the UK-based Charities Aid Foundation back in February argues.

The report, Give Me a Break (20 pages, PDF), argues that while there are things the UK can learn from the U.S. model of philanthropy, there are features of it that the UK, which has a well-organized welfare state, cannot and should not replicate. "For instance," the report notes, "the U.S. charitable deduction is inherently biased toward those [with] higher incomes....Similarly, donations in the U.S. go disproprtionately to religious causes and education (45 percent in total)."

A few other interesting facts from the report that are included in the infographic below:

  • The oldest surviving charity in the U.S. is the Scots' Charitable Society of Boston, which was founded in 1657 and incorporated in 1786; the oldest in the UK is the King's School, Canterbury, founded in 597.
  • The average deduction claimed for donations of clothes in the U.S. in 2004 was $1,400.
  • 2.6 percent of the UK workforce is employed by the voluntary sector, while the nonprofit sector accounts for 9.2 percent of wages and salaries in the U.S.
  • Evidence from the U.S. suggests that donations go up as tax rates rise.

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[Infographic] 10 Years in Social Media

March 29, 2014

We had three good candidates to choose from for this week's infographic: one from the Kauffman Foundation that explores the reasons behind lower business startup rates among women and proposes actions that would help to realize the promise of female entrepreneurs; a second, from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, that illustrates the critical role of forests to a healthy planet; and the one below.

We know what you're thinking -- the thought occurred to us, too. But, hey, bet you didn't know that, on the day he died, John D. Rockefeller -- who never tweeted or posted an update to Facebook -- was worth more than six times what Mark Zuckerberg is worth today.

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[Infographic] The Myth of the Millennial

March 15, 2014

Millennials. Generation Y. Echo Boomers. Generation We. Generation Me. The Net Generation. 

There are almost as many names for the millions of Americans born between 1982 and 1995 (or 1980-2000, or 1983-2004 -- definitions vary) as there are stererotypes about them. And there are a lot of stereotypes. Here are a few things we do know about them:

  • At 86 million, millennials are the largest generation in U.S. history (7 percent larger than their parents' boomer generation);
  • They are, in many respects, the best educated generation in U.S. history -- and the most burdened with student loan debt;
  • As the first generation of "digital natives," they are comfortable with technology and use it at higher rates than older generations;
  • According to a recent study conducted by the Pew Research Center, they are the most cynical and distrusting generation ever.

Okay, this kind of generational sterotyping, as conservative Jonah Goldberg calls it, can get old in a hurry. But it can also force us to examine our assumptions and biases. This week's infographic, which was put together by the folks at Onlinempadegrees.com and the UNC School of Government, is full of stats about the generation of young people we call millennials -- some of them surprising and others not so much. Take a look. And then use the comments section below to debunk some of your favorite millennial sterotypes. 

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Most Popular PhilanTopic Posts (February 2014)

March 01, 2014

Tragedy in Syria. Civil strife in Ukraine and Venezuela. Not enough snow in Sochi and more than enough pretty much everywhere else. The Fab Four at fifty and other reminders of boomer mortality. Here at PND, February 2014 was best summed up by a colleague who dubbed it "the longest short month ever." It was also the busiest month ever for PhilanTopic, as readers flocked to Laura Callanan's four-part series on social sector leadership and found lots of other things to like as well. Here, then, are the six or seven most popular posts on PhilanTopic for the month that just wouldn't end....

What did you read/watch/listen to in February that made you think, surprised you, or caused you to scratch your head? Share your finds in the comments section....

[infographic] The Psychology of Social Sharing

February 15, 2014

"I share, you share, we all share because...we...care."

Okay,it's not exactly the stuff of indie film legend -- although it does express something important about this particular moment in time. Sharing is in. Sharing is cool. We share, therefore we are. But, as this infographic from business analytics shop StatPro illustrates, we do it for different reasons -- and in different ways.

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[Infographic] Obamacare By the Numbers

February 08, 2014

Not since the Social Security Act was proposed, debated, and enacted in the 1930s has a federal statute generated has much controversy as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly called the Affordable Care Act and better known as Obamacare.

Much of that debate, at least in the public arena, has been characterized by anecdote and emotion and has been light on facts. The infographic below, which was created by Healthcare AdministrationDegree.net, goes some way to filling that void. Regardless of your position on Obamacare, we're pretty sure you'll learn something from it.

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[Infographic] 2014 Nonprofit Communication Trends

January 25, 2014

This week's infographic, which first appeared on Kivi Leroux Miller's Nonprofit Communications Marketing blog and is based on responses from more than twenty-one hundred nonprofit professionals to Leroux Miller's annual communications trends survey, is packed with interesting (and sometimes surprising) findings.

Who would have guessed, for instance, that engaging one's community (49 percent) and building general brand awareness (40 percent) would be mentioned by nonprofit communicators as higher priorities in 2014 than retaining current donors (30 percent)? Or that e-newsletters continue to be the most popular vehicle for communicating with one's supporters, ahead of both email and direct mail appeals? Or that Facebook is still viewed, by a large margin, as the most important social media site for nonprofits?

But don't take our word for it:

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