« Diversity in Grantmaking: A South Asian Perspective | Main | What Did Leona Want? »

Jobs and the Recovery

August 11, 2009

Anyone who thinks the "green shoots" of spring signal an imminent and/or robust economic recovery should consider these facts from Bob Herbert's op-ed column in ("A Scary Reality") today's New York Times:

Only 65 of every 100 men aged 20 through 24 years old were working on any given day in the first six months of this year. In the age group 25 through 34 years old, traditionally a prime age range for getting married and starting a family, just 81 of 100 men were employed.

For male teenagers, the numbers were disastrous: only 28 of every 100 males were employed in the 16- through 19-year-old age group. For minority teenagers, forget about it. The numbers are beyond scary; they're catastrophic.

This should be the biggest story in the United States. When joblessness reaches these kinds of extremes, it doesn't just damage individual families; it corrodes entire communities, fosters a sense of hopelessness and leads to disorder....

The official jobless rate is now...9.4 percent....It ticked down by 0.1 percent last month not because more people found jobs, but because 450,000 people withdrew from the labor market. They stopped looking, so they weren't counted as unemployed.

A truer picture of the employment crisis emerges when you combine the number of people who are officially counted as jobless with those who are working part time because they can't find full-time work and those in the so-called labor market reserve -- people who are not actively looking for work...but would take a job if one became available.

The tally from those three categories is a mind-boggling 30 million Americans -- 19 percent of the overall work force....

And that, says Herbert, is by far the nation's biggest problem and should be its number-one priority. Hard to argue with that.

-- Mitch Nauffts

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

For more on the likelihood of a "jobless" recovery and its impact on charitable giving, see Rick Cohen's thorough analysis in the Nonprofit Quarterly:

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Quote of the Week

  • "[L]et me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is...fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance...."


    — Franklin D. Roosevelt, 32nd president of the United States

Subscribe to Philantopic

Contributors

Guest Contributors

  • Laura Cronin
  • Derrick Feldmann
  • Thaler Pekar
  • Kathryn Pyle
  • Nick Scott
  • Allison Shirk

Tweets from @PNDBLOG

Follow us »

Filter posts

Select
Select
Select