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Talking Philanthropy: Doug White, George H. Heyman, Jr. Center for Philanthropy and Fundraising, New York University

March 02, 2011

My colleagues and I are big fans of Larry Blumenthal's incisive commentary on philanthropy and the brave new world of social media. So when Larry approached Matt Sinclair, PND's editor, about teaming up with consultant Bill Silberg, a veteran philanthropy practitioner, and PND to produce a podcast series featuring the people who are changing the way foundations and nonprofits do their work, we didn't think twice.

Why now? And why this particular focus? Larry put it well in a post on his Open Road Advisors blog:

Foundations are recognizing that they are more than grant makers. They are in the business of driving social change. They are increasingly understanding that communicating the "stories" of their work can be as important as the work itself. Through social media, they are beginning to open their typically closed processes and engage with the field in ways that help them drive change....

As is often the case with new intiatives, it took a bit longer than expected to pull the pieces together. But after listening to the first installment -- in which Larry and Bill chat with Doug White, academic director at NYU's George H. Heyman, Jr. Center for Philanthropy and Fundraising, about nonprofits and the economic recovery, the importance of organizational transparency, and the outlook for the year ahead -- we're excited.

Have a listen...

Running time: 00:17:13

(Right-click to download mp3)

Looking ahead, the plan is to roll out a new conversation every month -- and maybe more frequently, if time allows. In the meantime, we want to hear from you. What topics would you like to hear Larry and Bill address? Who should they talk to? And, given everyone's busy schedules, what's a good running time for a podcast?

Leave a comment below, or drop us a line at mfn@foundationcenter.org.

Comments

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Mr. Blumenthal made a great point in speaking about future challenges that lie ahead in the philanthropic sector, one is being more adept at speaking to the younger generation. The cell phone/facebook generation has mobilized giving for natural disasters, and they like the immediacy of "smart" social media that gives the facts while connecting to causes they care about. Is this trend here to stay? Yes, I believe so. History shows that while technology changes, the ideas behind them stays true. Just look at the music sector, we had records, the walkman, cd players, and then mp3's. I think the same will be said for philanthropy and social media. Generations will continue to ask what kind of world do I want to live in, and how can philanthropy contribute to this goal?

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